Recipe For Cari Ga | Chicken Curry With Sweet Potatoes

When James was younger he showed very little interest in food, other than eating it. One holiday we encouraged the boys to choose a vegetable to eat with the meals I was preparing and the vote went to sweet potatoes. We ate so many sweet potatoes that weekend I could not face them for years. When James showed an interest in learning how to cook curries I turned straight away to my Curry recipe book. I found a Vietnamese curry recipe for cari ga, a chicken curry with sweet potatoes and carrots that I knew would go down well. This mild curry made use of the cari powder I made a long time ago. It was a great dish to get started with and I was most impressed with the flavour, and the enthusiasm James showed in cooking for us. Of course this was done at our house and I bought all the ingredients! This chicken curry recipe calls for the chicken to be in the marinade for an hour, but we did not leave it that long and I don’t believe it affected the tenderness of the chicken or the flavour. If you have the time, leave the chicken to marinate for the hour though. This sweet curry is a traditional Vietnamese dish from the south of the country.

Chicken Curry With Sweet Potatoes Recipe For Cari Ga | Chicken Curry With Sweet Potatoes

“Chicken Curry With Sweet Potatoes”

Recipe For Cari Ga | Chicken Curry With Sweet Potatoes

Recipe adapted from Curry page 285

Ingredients:

  • 6 chicken thighs
  • 30mls cari powder or any mild / sweet curry powder, divided
  • 15mls caster sugar - I used fructose
  • 5mls salt
  • 30mls canola oil
  • 2 large sweet potatoes, peeled and cubed
  • 3 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 3 shallots, quartered
  • 1 tin coconut cream
  • 2 stalks lemongrass, bruised
  • 2 kaffir lime leaves
  • 30mls fish sauce
  • 3 carrots, peeled and sliced

Method:

  • Place the chicken into a large bowl
  • Mix together 15mls cari powder, the sugar and salt
  • Add to the chicken and toss to coat
  • Leave to marinade
  • Heat the oil in a large pot over a medium heat
  • Cook the sweet potato for about 5 minutes, sealing all over
  • Remove and put onto kitchen paper to drain
  • Place the chicken into the pot skin side down and brown
  • Turn over and seal before removing and setting aside
  • Add the garlic and shallots to the pot and sauté until soft
  • Add the rest of the cari powder and mix in
  • Cook until you can smell the spices
  • Add the coconut cream, lemongrass, lime leaves, fish sauce and carrots
  • Place the chicken and any drippings into the pot together with the sweet potatoes
  • Bring to the boil then reduce the heat and simmer for 20 minutes
http://tandysinclair.com/recipe-for-cari-ga-chicken-curry-with-sweet-potatoes/

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For nutritional information click here

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Mirage, Clive Cussler

Mirage opening line: By the time the echo from the first knock on his door rebounded off the back of his cabin, Captain Charles Urquhart was fully awake.

Mirage Mirage, Clive Cussler

Mirage

This book, written together with Jack Du Brul is gripping from start to finish. Juan Cabrillo together with his team aboard the Oregon travel from North Siberia, to China, with diversions along the way to prove that ships cannot be teleported around the world! They have every imaginable weapon and military toy available to them, and in this book make great use of each and every one of them to save the lives of people they are tasked to protect, recover billions in stolen money, and prevent a war!

They are a force that do not really exist and are a part of the American arsenal that no one really knows about. I have not read every one of the 9 books in this series, but each one is credible enough to make you wonder! Rush out and get yourself a copy of this book.

First published in the United States of America by G.P. Putnam’s Sons in 2013

ISBN number 978-0-718-15845-3

Paperback – 401 pages

Disclaimer: I was sent the book to review by Penguin Books South Africa. I was not required to write a positive review. This disclaimer is in line with my blogging policy.

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Yoghurt Pastry Recipe

I love the satisfaction of making my own pastry at home, especially when it ends up crisp and short and perfect. I decided to develop a pastry that makes use of yoghurt instead of the traditional sour cream as I often do not have sour cream to hand. Yoghurt is a fixed ingredient in my house as I top my granola with it, and I am using yoghurt to make my rusks. I have taken photographs of the steps I use to blind bake my pastry. I take it for granted that everyone knows what this means, but maybe there is someone reading this blog who is not familiar with the term. Blind baking ensures that the pastry’s bottom edge is cooked properly and that you don’t end up with a wet mess holding up your delicious filling. This pastry is very fine and needs to be filled before you can take it out of the tart tin.

Pastry Step 1 300x225 Yoghurt Pastry Recipe

Pastry Step 1

step 1: Cut out a circle of baking paper to fit the bottom of your pastry tin. Spray non stick cooking spray around the edges and the base of your pastry tin. Place the cut circle onto the base of the pastry tin.

 

 

Pastry Step 2 300x225 Yoghurt Pastry Recipe

Pastry Step 2

 

 

step 2: Once the pastry is made, shape the pastry into a disc and lightly flour the pastry. Wrap in a sheet of baking paper and leave to rest in the fridge. I use this sheet of baking paper to roll the pastry out, as well as for the blind baking.

 

 

Pastry Step 3 300x225 Yoghurt Pastry Recipe

Pastry Step 3

 

 

step 3: Using your rolling pin depress the pastry across the centre. Turn the pastry so that the depressed line is straight across, and make another depression across the first depression, to form a plus sign (+). Now turn the pastry so that the plus makes a cross (x) in front of you. Make another depression and now start rolling.

Pastry Measured To Size 300x225 Yoghurt Pastry Recipe

Pastry Measured To Size

Pastry Step 4 300x225 Yoghurt Pastry Recipe

Pastry Step 4

 

 

To maintain the round shape roll the pastry once from top to bottom and then turn the pastry a quarter turn. Repeat this until the pastry is the correct size.

 

 

 

 

step 4: Flour your rolling pin and roll the pastry onto the rolling pin. Now place the tin alongside the rolling pin and gently roll your pastry into the tin, being careful to not cut the edges if at all possible. Don’t worry if you do as you can always patch them.

 

 

Pastry Step 5 300x225 Yoghurt Pastry Recipe

Pastry Step 5

 

step 5: Turn the edges in and then start pressing the pastry into the tin to make sure it is a snug fit.

 

 

 

 

Pastry Step 6 300x225 Yoghurt Pastry Recipe

Pastry Step 6

 

step 6: To make sure the pastry does not lift I use the back of my muddler to press the edges down properly. You can use the back of your rolling pin if the size is suitable. Once this is done, the pasty goes back into the fridge.

 

 

Pastry Step 7 300x225 Yoghurt Pastry Recipe

Pastry Step 7

 

 

step 7: I then use a table fork to prick the bottom of the pastry

 

 

 

 

Pastry Step 8 300x225 Yoghurt Pastry Recipe

Pastry Step 8

 

step 8: Now place the baking paper into the tin (I cut it round to make it easier) and place your baking beans on top. If you don’t have baking beans you can use dry beans or rice. Just save them after you have used them for the next time you make pastry.

 

 

Pastry Step 9 300x225 Yoghurt Pastry Recipe

Pastry Step 9

 

step 9: I place the pastry tin onto a baking tin to make it easier to handle and to make sure I don’t pop the loose bottom out by mistake. After 15 minutes of baking the baking beans are removed and the tart is baked for a further 5 minutes.

 

 

 

Pastry Step 10 300x225 Yoghurt Pastry Recipe

Pastry Step 10

step 10: Last but not least, as soon as I take the pastry out of the oven I use a brush to brush on an egg wash. This seals the pastry and it can now be filled with what ever you want to make for your tart flavour.

 

 

 

Yoghurt Pastry Recipe

Ingredients:

  • 125g flour
  • 100g cold butter, cut into small cubes
  • 15g sugar - I used fructose
  • 80g thick plain yoghurt
  • for the egg wash
  • 1 egg yolk beaten with 5mls water

Method:

  • Place the flour, butter and sugar into a food processor and process on a low speed until the flour resembles bread crumbs
  • Add the yoghurt and process until the dough comes together
  • Turn out onto a light floured surface and form into a flat, round disk
  • Dust lightly with flour, wrap in baking paper and refrigerate for 20 minutes
  • Preheat the oven to 200° Celsius
  • Roll out on light floured baking paper to just fit your flan / tart / pie tin with a little overlap
  • Refrigerate for 20 minutes
  • Prick the bottom with a fork and blind bake for 15 minutes
  • Remove the baking beans and bake for another 5 minutes
  • Seal the surface with the egg wash
  • Trim the edges of the pastry

Cooks Notes:

Do not roll out the pastry more than once.

http://tandysinclair.com/yoghurt-pastry-recipe/

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For nutritional information click here

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Planning A Holiday

I wrote a long blog post which was very well received on planning a holiday when I had a blog on the Taste Magazine platform. Dave and I are very fortunate to travel overseas at least once a year. This has been made possible as we have taken the money we were spending on school fees and allocated it to holidays. This is the bonus of having children who are all grown up. The other bonus is that they can house sit!

The first step in planning a holiday is deciding where you want to go. We prefer to choose one region of a country and explore that. We do this as we are time constrained due to our businesses. Once we have decided where we want to go we can look at the logistics of making this happen. As we plan our trips so far in advance, the first thing we look for is accommodation. You will need to have accommodation booked in order to apply for a Visa but if you are at all concerned about not getting a Visa then using a booking site where there are no cancellation fees. We use booking.com and have never had a problem with them even when we have had to cancel bookings.

Once our accommodation is sorted out we book our flights. We believe in taking the shortest route to our destination so if we are flying to London we fly British Airways from Cape Town to Heathrow with no stop overs. We fly Air France to Paris and either Air France or Swiss to other European destinations other than Germany as SAA fly there directly. We have friends who fly via Dubai to get places but I personally would rather spend a little extra on the flight and get to my holiday as quickly as possible. If you do have layovers remember to allow yourself enough time to clear customs / change terminals / collect luggage / check in etc.

Now, we are nearly ready to go. All we need to do is sort out car hire if we are self driving – for this we use Europcar. You can register with them and so all of Dave’s information is stored in their data base. It means that the car is ready and waiting for us and all they need is a signature when we arrive. We take out full insurance which means that we can just drop the car off no matter what the condition, and we will not be charged. It costs extra but believe you me, it is much easier than having to worry about replacing tyres if you get a puncture! You will need an international driver’s license which you can get from the local AA shop. In Italy we often make use of the trains and in London we use our Oyster cards to get around on public transport.

As for foreign exchange (forex) we prefer to take cash notes with us! You can use your credit card quite safely overseas but many small vendors to not have card facilities. Take some small note denominations with you as even though we are used to paying for things with a R100 note, people in Europe don’t often see €100 notes! Also, in Germany you cannot use a debit card to buy groceries. You can only get your forex 60 days before you fly and as our accommodation is paid for before we leave SA we budget on €100 a day for food, petrol, going out and we always have change. We don’t skimp ever on anything as we have budgeted for this.

We prefer to self cater – we shop in the markets and local stores and cook for ourselves. We spend as much money overseas even with the horrific conversion as we do here on groceries. Each trip we will eat out at least once at a restaurant with a Michelin Star (or two) if possible. If you buy local, seasonable produce you can eat very well for very little! (this applies no matter where you are). If you are not going to self cater then in my opinion a B&B is far more pleasurable as you will feel like you are at home, and they make more of an effort with breakfast than most hotels will, no matter the grading of the hotel.

Remember before you go overseas to check the weather and make sure you pack enough clothes – it sounds silly, but you do not want to be looking for a laundromat when you are only away for 2 weeks. Pack smartly and you will not be overweight. Also check what public / religious holidays will be taking place while you are overseas. When we were on the barge, we went over Easter weekend and everything shut down for 3 days of our trip. Bank holidays in England can affect hotel bookings and Ramadan in Muslim countries will mean you cannot eat out during the day at many public places.

I turn my sim card off on my cell phone off when we travel as my MTN mobile does not work for some odd reason when we are out of the country, despite me having roaming. It is a software glitch. Dave leaves his turned on. But we both turn our data off. Roaming data costs are very high. We have a UK Vodafone simcard which cost us nothing and is pay as you go. We get data with each purchase of airtime and we use this all over the world. It is a bit pricey out of the UK, but much less pricey than using our South African phones. We send an sms from the phone each month to keep it active. You can buy a sim card in each country you visit – just look to see which mobile provider offers the best coverage for the area you will be in. Wifi is cheap in Europe and so many pubs, restaurants, hotels etc. offer free wifi. We sit down once a day at least to check emails while we are ‘on the go’ so we are never out of touch. I don’t bother travelling with my laptop – I use my tablet for emails but Dave has his laptop as we save our photos on it.

What ever you do and where ever you go, have fun! I hope you found this interesting and if you have any questions go ahead and ask, it will help me create new blog posts.

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Chickpea Crêpe Recipe

This month we were challenged to make pathiri, which are rice flour pancakes traditionally eaten during Ramadan. I am sure I must have tasted them when I was in Dubai over Ramadan, but I cannot remember that far back ;). I have a lot of gluten free flour in my house but I do not have any rice flour, and so I could not make traditional pathiri. However the mandatory item was to make a crepe of your choosing, representing your inner creativity or based on your experience that interests you and add any “simple” condiments to complement your style, your culture or flavours you chose. I decided that the best thing for me to do was to create a crêpe recipe using the ingredients I had to hand, being chickpea flour and coconut milk. I also wanted to create a vegan dish and so did not use eggs for this chickpea crêpe recipe. I was a little worried that the batter would be too thick, but it was perfect. I made small crêpes to eat with savoury mince and I served them in the manner they would be traditionally served at a Muslim table, with no cutlery. You use the crêpe to gather the mince and the combination of flavours made for a very delicious Sunday supper.

Chickpea Crêpes Chickpea Crêpe Recipe

Chickpea Crêpes

Chickpea Crêpe Recipe

Ingredients:

  • 250g chickpea flour
  • 5mls masala
  • Pinch of salt
  • 430mls coconut milk
  • Ghee for frying

Method:

  • Place the chickpea flour into a bowl
  • Add the masala and salt and mix in
  • Using a whisk, slowly mix in the coconut milk making sure you have no lumps in the batter
  • Set aside for half an hour at least
  • Heat a crêpe pan
  • Melt some ghee on the pan and brush off the excess ghee
  • Place 60mls of the batter onto the pan and twirl to get a circle
  • Turn only once the batter is cooked
  • Leave for another minute before taking off the pan and making the next one

Cooks Notes:

You can use butter for the frying if you don't have ghee

http://tandysinclair.com/chickpea-crepe-recipe/

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For nutritional information click here

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The April Daring Cooks Challenge was brought to us by Joanna from What’s On The List. She taught us all about Pathiri and challenged us to create our own version of this inspirational Indian dish!

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Sourdough Whole Wheat Seed Bread Recipe

Artisinal bread is a labour of love. You have to have patience, but the reward is great! I make use of a sourdough starter which provides bacterial (in the good sense) action on the starch and proteins in my bread dough. At the Taste Glacier event I attended, we were given a recipe for whole wheat seed bread, which called for a poolish. A poolish is a pre-fermented starter. This pre-ferment allows more time for the yeast and enzymes to take action on the starch and proteins in the dough.  The use of a pre-ferment means your bread will keep longer and it adds more flavour to your bread. As I already have a sourdough starter I decided to rather use that instead of making the poolish. I cannot tell you if this made a difference to the bread, but I can tell you that it tasted good, which to me is all that matters.

Have you ever made a poolish before?

Sourdough Whole Wheat Seed Bread Sourdough Whole Wheat Seed Bread Recipe

Sourdough Whole Wheat Seed Bread

Sourdough Whole Wheat Seed Bread Recipe

Adapted from Café Food by Evan Faull page 32

Ingredients:

    for the seed mix
  • 5g sesame seeds
  • 5g linseeds
  • 5g rolled oats
  • 5g sunflower seeds
  • 15g digestive bran
  • 3g pumpkin seeds
  • 1g aniseeds
  • 45mls boiling water
  • for the bread dough
  • 250g unsifted whole wheat flour
  • 10g salt
  • 200g fed sourdough starter
  • 15g honey
  • 5g sugar - I used fructose
  • 8g yeast
  • 12.5mls canola oil, plus extra for the bowl and tin
  • 175mls tap water

Method:

    for the seed mix
  • Mix the seeds with the water and set aside to absorb while you make your bread dough
  • for the bread dough
  • Lightly oil a mixing bowl with oil
  • Place all of the ingredients for the bread dough into the bowl of a stand mixer
  • Mix for 4 minutes on slow and then 8 minutes on a medium speed
  • Place the dough into the oiled mixing bowl and cover with a damp cloth
  • Leave in a warm place to prove for 40 minutes
  • Lightly oil a loaf tin
  • Place the dough into the tin and flatten with wet hands
  • Cover and prove for 50 minutes
  • Preheat the oven to 220° Celsius
  • Lightly spray the top of the dough with water and place the seed mix on top of the dough
  • Place some ice blocks into your oven when you put the loaf tin in and bake for 55 minutes
  • Turn out onto a wire rack to cool
http://tandysinclair.com/sourdough-whole-wheat-seed-bread-recipe/

For conversions click here

Disclaimer: I was invited to Taste Glacier event and I was not asked to write a blog post about my experiences. This disclaimer is in line with my blogging policy.

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Stocking A Pantry With Container Items

There is no right way or wrong way to stock a pantry. This is just a post to share how I went about stocking my pantry. The items have grown over the years and as the pantry cupboard in my new kitchen is going to be quite narrow I have put all of my items into lock and go containers. These work really well. You can also see that I am a bit obsessed and everything in my kitchen is labelled!

Flour Stocking A Pantry With Container Items

Flour

Flour is a basic ingredient needed in any pantry. You do not need to go overboard with a lot of different flours but I would recommend ordinary cake flour and self-raising for baking, bread flour for bread making and cornflour as a thickener. As you can see, I have 9 different types of flour!

Seeds Stocking A Pantry With Container Items

Seeds

Next in my pantry is a collection of seeds. These are essential for the granola which I make every week. Pumpkin seeds are a worthwhile buy as they can be used toasted in soups, and for breads. Beans and lentils make up the next section. I also love to sprout my own sprouts and beans and lentils are a cost efficient way of bulking your meals.

Beans and Lentils Stocking A Pantry With Container Items

Beans and Lentils

Rice is another house hold staple and you need to stock at least white rice and either jasmine or basmati rice for curries in my opinion. Personally, I prefer brown and wild rice for my casseroles.

Rice Stocking A Pantry With Container Items

Rice

Sugar is next on the list. You will need granulated (white or brown) sugar and icing sugar at the very least in your pantry. As I do not use sugar I have fructose in my pantry. If you are going to replace sugar in your diet I would recommend you buy fructose over any other product.

Sugar and Fructose Stocking A Pantry With Container Items

Sugar and Fructose

Pasta features heavily in my kitchen – the container marked spaghetti contains three different types of long pasta. I also always have a lot of pasta shapes and keep a few packets in the cupboard. Once opened I place the pasta into the container. These last a long time in my house as I prefer to make pasta from scratch when ever possible.

Pasta Stocking A Pantry With Container Items

Pasta

For salad making and side dishes, we use quinoa the most often, and cous cous for variations. I also keep maize meal for pap as well as bulgar wheat for one of the bread recipes I use.

Quinoa Cous Cous Maize and Bulgar Stocking A Pantry With Container Items

Quinoa, Cous Cous, Maize and Bulgar

My muesli container is for the little bit of granola I keep at home. Mixed nuts, dried fruit, rolled oats and dessicated coconut all go into making it. Rolled oats are a breakfast must! Dave makes them with a dash of whisky and cream or butter!

Granola Ingredients Stocking A Pantry With Container Items

Granola Ingredients

Then I have my snack containers. I have recently added popcorn to this list which is a great snack in my opinion. The crumpet mix is for a quick afternoon treat and I have matza nearly every day with peanut butter and cheese. Dave and I have cheese on crackers every night after dinner.

Snacks Stocking A Pantry With Container Items

Snacks

I will follow up this post with what I keep in my pantry cupboard in the near future. If you would like to show me what is in your pantry please link back to this post and I will create a link love list.

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Ice Tea Recipe

Summer is all but over but that does not mean I need to stop drinking ice tea. It is refreshing and the fact that I use rooibos tea, means that it is healthy as well. I was recently invited to attend an event hosted by Freshpak where we were served ice teas and a selection of canapés made with rooibos. Rooibos translates to red bush and the tea is full of anti oxidants. I have used it before on the blog when I made my Rooibos and Lavender Tea Sorbet. Rooibos is a fynbos and is indigenous to South Africa. At the event we were shown how to make a base ice tea and to this base you can add any flavour you choose. How about some frozen berries, cooked down to a syrup and then passed through a sieve? Or some lime juice and fresh mint leaves? The possibilities are endless. From the lovely gift box I received, I made my own pomegranate ice tea.

What is your favourite ice tea flavour?

Ice Tea Ice Tea Recipe

Ice Tea

Ice Tea Recipe

Ingredients:

    basic ice tea
  • 500mls boiling water
  • 5 rooibos tea bags
  • honey to sweeten
  • 500mls ice cold water
  • for pomegranate ice tea
  • 500mls boiling water
  • 5 rooibos tea bags
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 1 pomegranate, cut in half
  • Zest and juice of 1 lime
  • 2 sprigs mint, lightly bruised
  • honey to sweeten
  • 500mls ice cold water

Method:

    basic ice tea
  • Pour the boiling water into a jug and add the tea bags
  • Steep for 5 minutes before discarding the tea bags
  • Sweeten to taste with honey
  • Add the ice cold water
  • for pomegranate ice tea
  • Pour the boiling water into a jug and add the tea bags
  • Add the cinnamon stick
  • Steep for 5 minutes before discarding the tea bags
  • Add the arils from one half of the pomegranate, and the juice from the other half
  • Add the lime juice and zest and the mint
  • Sweeten to taste with honey
  • Add the ice cold water
  • for ice tea
  • leave to chill before serving and keep in the fridge
http://tandysinclair.com/ice-tea-recipe/

For conversions click here

Disclaimer: I was invited to the Freshpak event and I was not asked to write a blog post about my experiences. This disclaimer is in line with my blogging policy.

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Apricot Ice Cream Recipe

It is always good to have your ego boosted by wonderful compliments. From when I started blogging, I looked at myself as offering great recipes that work. I have never looked at myself as taking good photographs. Because of this, I have not bothered to save any of my photos in a high resolution format. Once they have been uploaded to my blog I delete them. I could see no reason to keep them on my hard drive. But that has all changed. In January I was approached by an International Publisher asking if I would contribute a recipe to a magazine they are publishing in a series of magazines, this one specifically using sugar free recipes. They wanted one of my existing recipes but as I could not send them a high res photo, they could not use it. I offered to send them a recipe that was not yet published on my blog, and one that I had a high res photo of. And the recipe I sent them was this one for apricot ice cream. And the reply email was about how great the image was! This compliment was followed by one on my blog from a professional food photographer whom I rate very highly, given his work and reputation in the industry. This recipe for apricot ice cream came about when I had a punnet of very over ripe apricots that needed using up. As it was the height of summer and we had visitors, it seemed like a great refreshing ice cream to make, and it is. The apricot flavour is quite distinct and I am sure you can use any stone fruit to make this recipe.

Apricot Ice Cream Apricot Ice Cream Recipe

Apricot Ice Cream

Apricot Ice Cream Recipe

Ingredients:

  • 400mls milk
  • 6 apricots, cut in half and pip removed
  • 5 cardamom pods, lightly crushed
  • 5 egg yolks
  • 80g sugar - I used fructose
  • 100mls cream

Method:

  • Place the milk, apricots and cardamom into a saucepan
  • Bring to blood temperature over a medium heat
  • Poach the apricots for 5 minutes
  • Whisk the egg yolks and the fructose together until you reach a ribbon stage
  • Sieve the milk onto the egg yolks and set the apricots aside
  • Whisk the milk into the egg yolks and return the mixture to your saucepan
  • Stir with a wooden spoon until a custard forms and remove from the heat
  • Remove the cardamom pods from the apricots and purée until smooth
  • Place the custard into a jug and stir in the apricot purée
  • Cool overnight and then churn in an ice cream churner as per the manufacturer’s instructions
http://tandysinclair.com/apricot-ice-cream-recipe/

For conversions click here

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Org De Rac, Piketberg

Org De Rac is situated in the heart of the Swartland, on the foothills of the Piketberg mountains. I have been very fortunate to see the wines from this estate grow in stature and can easily say that the wines are worth buying and drinking. We have tasted these wines since the first bottling and they are now scoring high with local wine lovers and organizations. The wines are ready for drinking, but can be left in the bottle for you to enjoy in a few years time.

Org De Rac Org De Rac, Piketberg

Org De Rac

The most remarkable thing to note about these wines are that they are organic. The entire farm is run on organic principles and together with the grapes, olives are grown and pressed into olive oil, and sold at the estate. We recently took a drive to Org de Rac at the end of the harvest, where all that was left on the vines was a row of Shiraz which will be bottled as the South African equivalent to Port.

Must before it becomes Merlot Org De Rac, Piketberg

Must before it becomes Merlot

Our outing started with refreshing must. This is the juice from the grapes which is left to ferment to become wine. I enjoyed two glasses of must before we walked to the cellar for a tour given to us by the winemaker. Frank offered me more must to taste – the third glass being slightly more fermented that the first two. After seeing the various stages of the wine making process in action, and a visit to the barrel cellar, we proceeded to sit outside and enjoy a meal arranged by the owner of the wine estate for the people instrumental in getting the wines to where they are now. This includes 3 reserve wines and a Méthode Cap Classique that I cannot get enough of! The Cuvee La Verne is produced from Chardonnay grapes and has a lovely citrus nose.

Bubbly and Olive Oil Org De Rac, Piketberg

Bubbly and Olive Oil

High on my list of red wines is the 2011 Reserve Shiraz followed very closely by the 2012 Cabernet Sauvignon. Both offer the dark berry taste that I most favour in a red wine. I can highly recommend that you take a drive for a wine tasting – they are open Monday to Friday 9am – 5pm and Saturdays 9am – 1pm and are situated on the N7 between Moorreesburg and Piketberg, 120km outside of Cape Town. They also have the most stunning bridal suite and offer an ideal wedding venue.

A perfect day at Org de Rac Org De Rac, Piketberg

A perfect day at Org de Rac

Disclaimer: Dave and I went to Org de Rac as guests of the owner. This blog post has not been solicited and I have not been compensated in any form for the content. We are personal friends of the owner and enjoy the wines at his house most Sunday afternoons. This disclaimer is in line with my blogging policy. What I blogged:

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