Galangal

Galangal, not to be confused with ginger is also known as blue ginger, Siamese ginger and Thai ginger. Greater galangal is a rhizomatous perennial producing several 2m stalks with alternate sheathing leaves. The flowers are followed by red three-valved fruits. The white fleshed rhizomes have a characteristic spice and pine fragrance, and are widely used in Asian cooking. The flowers, flower buds and cardamom-scented red fruits are all edible.

Galangal requires warm temperate to subtropical conditions and grows best in rich, moist, well drained soils. It is an annual crop grown by seed or from rhizome segments. Cut them so that each segment contains one or two buds.

For fresh culinary use, dig up the rhizomes in late summer or early autumn. Store fresh galangal in a cool, dark place for up to 2 weeks. Dry the root about 10 months after planting. Store dried slices in an airtight container in a dry, dark place for 2 – 3 years.

Galangals’ flavour is similar to ginger’s but is not as strong. Use the rhizomes fresh, or in dried slices, with fish and in soups. Before using dried slices, soak them in hot water for 30 minutes. If you cannot find galangal substitute half the quantity in your recipe with grated fresh ginger.

information sourced from The Complete Book of Herbs
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21 thoughts on “Galangal

  1. Bless You Tandy, one more plant/seasoning to start looking for.

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    1. Hope you can find some!

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  2. Love this post. I do have galangal in the spice rack but didn’t have any idea that it was a ginger or that I could use ginger as a substitute. Thanks for this one Tandy.

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    1. my pleasure Tammy 🙂

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  3. I’m going to say it again, loving this series. This is another new one for me.

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    1. awesome Greg 🙂

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  4. Hmm, don’t think I have used galangal before – must look out for it.
    :- ) Mandy

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    1. it has such a lovely soft flavour 🙂

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  5. I’ve heard of it but never used it. I’ll have to keep an eye out for it!

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    1. I am sure you will find this easily Bexx 🙂

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  6. It definitely imparts something sophisticated to a dish 🙂

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    1. yup, like an upmarket version of the lower class ginger 🙂

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  7. Thanks for the useful info! I always wondered what the difference was! 🙂 Cheers!
    -Jen

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    1. my pleasure Jen 🙂

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  8. We can´t get it here but I´ll have to rememebr to stock up on the next London trip! It´s lovely because it´s so much more delicate than ginger.

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    1. I buy the bottled version here 🙂

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  9. Very interesting. I didn’t know this plant. I do now 🙂
    Have a nice day!

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    1. I love using galangal as it has a nice mild flavour 🙂

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    2. Blue Ginger probably would go good making Blue Jelly Beans.,
      Heh Bless You Vanna

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      1. What an interesting thought!

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