Recipe For Guava Ice Cream

I cannot remember where we were, or what the conversation was, but someone mentioned the term domestic blindness and I wrote it down, thinking it would be a great topic for a post. Domestic blindness is the inability to see something that is plainly visible. Well, I am not sure about you, but I think this is a term that can be ascribed to any male living with someone. Dave suffers from this in the most profound way. He will open a cupboard looking for something, and shut it after a few seconds, exclaiming quite loudly that he cannot find whatever it is he was looking for. I will then go to the very same cupboard, open it and take out the item, without having to look further than the front row. This will happen when he looks in the drawers as well, so it is horizontal and vertical spaces that he has this issue with. Sometimes I find it most frustrating, and other times, quite endearing that he needs my help! One thing Dave does not need my help with is making dessert every night – which in his words he makes from scratch. What he really means is that he puts it into the bowls for us to enjoy. As I had been gifted so many guavas I made poached guavas to go with my guava ice cream.

Do you suffer from domestic blindness, or does your partner suffer from this?

"Poached Guavas With Guava Ice Cream"

Poached Guavas With Guava Ice Cream

Guava Ice Cream
 
Ingredients
for the guavas
  • 150g water
  • 150g sugar - I used fructose
  • 1 star anise
  • 300g peeled weight guavas, cut in half
for the crème anglaise
  • 300mls milk
  • 200mls cream
  • 1 star anise
  • 5 egg yolks
  • 80g sugar - I used fructose
Method
for the guavas
  1. Place the water and sugar into a sauce pan
  2. Bring to the boil and stir until the sugar dissolves
  3. Boil for 5 minutes and then reduce the heat
  4. Add the guavas and poach for 30 minutes until soft
  5. Strain and retain the simple syrup for future use, discard the star anise
  6. Purée the guavas and leave in the fridge overnight
for the crème anglaise
  1. Gently heat the milk and the cream with the star anise in a sauce pan until blood temperature
  2. Whisk together the egg yolks and sugar until reaches a ribbon stage
  3. Pour half of the milk over the eggs, whisking the entire time
  4. Pour the eggs back into the sauce pan and stir with a wooden spoon over a medium heat until a custard form
  5. Strain and place into the fridge overnight
for the ice cream
  1. Whisk the guavas into the crème anglaise until completely mixed
  2. Churn in your ice cream maker until the desired consistency
  3. Place into a freezer container and freeze

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In My Kitchen December 2014

This is a very short instalment to end off the year and share with you what is new In My Kitchen. I want to take the opportunity to wish Celia (from Fig Jam And Lime Cordialand her family a blessed Christmas. I love these #IMK posts and I cannot wait to come back in 2015 and share more with you.

This month I have done a lot of baking. I did not post the recipe for the cupcakes that I made. They were part of a competition for Yuppiechef and I used a sponge cake recipe that was given to us, to make these cupcakes. I did not win but my effort was rewarded with a voucher and I have used that to get myself some new attachments for my Kitchen Aid Stand Mixer.

"Baking for Yuppiechef"

Baking for Yuppiechef

We received the most beautiful table gifts at the launch of La Bella Restaurant and Bistro and I have left this cheese board on our table as a permanent fixture. I love the texture of the wood! It came with a cheese knife and fork set.

"Cheese Board"

Cheese Board

I reckon I have the largest collection of Kitchen Aid attachments and I cannot stop collecting them. I already have drums for medium and coarse shredding as well as slicing and I have now added a potato grater, a drum for stripping (Julienne) and one for fine shredding. I hope to test the fine shredder on horseradish when it is next in season.

"Kitchen Aid Optional Drums"

Kitchen Aid Optional Drums

I had a 15% discount voucher for Le Creuset from the latest issue of Taste Magazine and I used it to buy an espresso mug in their new colour palm.

"Le Creuset Palm"

Le Creuset Palm

We have an 8 seater dining room table and I wanted 8 espresso mugs to use for desserts. I now have 8 and I cannot wait to use them.

"Le Creuset Espresso Mugs"

Le Creuset Espresso Mugs

At the Baleia Bay Wines launch we were given a wine opener and bottle stopper. I love that the wine opener has a bottle opener on it as well, as that is something most useful in our house.

"Wine Opener And Bottle Stopper"

Wine Opener And Bottle Stopper

I want to thank each and every one of you for taking a peek into my kitchen. I hope that you come back next month to see what is new.

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Recipe For Dulce De Leche

I have an acute sense of smell and so I don’t like it when my shower gel smells like soap, or my candles smell of wax. I know this sounds strange but it is the way it is. I rely on my sense of smell to tell me when the fructose is at the right stage when making caramels as well as for when dinner is done. I can smell a fire long before I see the smoke and yet, I cannot smell something burning in my own home. I am not sure why this is. I also rely on my smell to tell me when something is too sweet, like cooked pineapple. Having seen plenty of recipes that use Dulce De Leche – either store bought or made from condensed milk I was really happy to see this recipe in my Taste Magazine. It is so easy to make and the smell emanating from my kitchen was fantastic, and not too sweet. The taste is even better and this is one ingredient you will make over and over again, just to eat on its own. I used my dulce de leche to make a tart and used the leftovers in some cinnamon ice cream to add another dimension to the flavour profile.

Have you ever made your own dulce de leche, and do you like the smell of sweet ingredients?

"Dulce De Leche"

Dulce De Leche

5.0 from 6 reviews
Dulce De Leche
 
You will never need to buy store bought Dulce De Leche again after making this simple recipe
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED:
Makes: 375mls
Ingredients
  • 500mls milk
  • 150g caster sugar - I used fructose
  • 1.25mls salt
  • 1.25mls bicarbonate of soda
  • 2.5mls vanilla extract
Method
  1. Place all of the ingredients into a medium size saucepan and do not stir
  2. Place onto a medium heat and leave until the milk begins to bubble
  3. Remove from the heat and change the heat to the lowest setting
  4. Stir well with a wooden spoon, skim off the foam and place back on the heat
  5. You will need to give this a good stir every 15 minutes for 3 hours, skimming each time you stir
  6. When the dulce de leche is thick enough to stick to the back of a wooden spoon remove from the heat
  7. Set aside to cool completely before placing into a sterilized glass jar
  8. Store in the fridge and use as needed

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Dead Men’s Bones, James Oswald

Dead Men’s Bones opening line: The pain is everywhere.

"Dead Men's Bones"

Dead Men’s Bones

This is the 4th book in the Inspector McLean books, and follows on from The Hangman’s Song. Tony McLean is back at work, and investigating two seemingly unrelated incidents. On one hand he must try and discover how a very tattooed man ended up dead, naked and in the water, and on the other hand he is tasked to unearth why a man killed his family and then committed suicide. At the same time, his trusted colleague comes down with an illness for no apparent reason. It is only Emma’s postcards, and the cats that keep him grounded and safe.

I really enjoy James Oswald’s way with words and this book was another great read. I am looking forward to the future novels and will make a note to get the first two which will give me some background to the ones I have already read. I can highly recommend this book.

First published by the Penguin Group in 2014

ISBN number 978-1-405-91709-4

Paperback – 459 pages

Disclosure: I was sent the book to review by Penguin Books South Africa. I was not required to write a positive review. This post is in line with my blogging policy.

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Out And About: Friday 28 November 2014

Dave and I were invited by friends of ours to be their guest at Equus Restaurant situated on the Cavalli Wine and Stud Farm. We all arrived half an hour earlier than the booking so that we could sit outside, enjoy the view and sip on some champagne. The manager wanted us to have placed our orders at the exact time the booking was for, which made us feel a little bit rushed. This was so not necessary, especially as the restaurant was not full. We also had not been given menus so would not have been able to comply in any case. Once we had perused the menu Dorothy asked the waiter what the line fish was and the reply was angel fish. This is quite bad for a top notch restaurant as angel fish are usually a by catch of hake trawling and in no way should be classed as line fish. We were told that there were 5 portions left, after which the menu change would be to hake! Dorothy lost her sense of humour at this, and I cannot blame her. Hake is a cheap stock fish – and to make it worse, angel fish is even cheaper. That aside, we had an amazing meal, with the sommelier choosing a white wine for our starters, a red for our main course and a dessert wine to accompany our sweets. Dave then chose the malt whisky to enjoy after dinner which is going to result in a whisky tasting evening at home. Thank you John and Dorothy for the very kind invitation.

"Baleia Bay Wine Cellar"

Baleia Bay Wine Cellar

Last Thursday night we headed out and about to Riversdale. Dave and I had been invited to the grand opening of Baleia Bay Wine Cellar and La Bella Deli & Restaurant. The invitation was extended by Yolandi De Wet PR on behalf of the owners, Fanie Joubert, his son Jan-Hendrik and daughter Lizeth. We had popped into the Deli a few weeks back on our way to Mossel Bay and even though they were officially closed, they still made us espressos to take away. We left the office at 3 and made our way to the Guest House where accommodation had been organized for us. After sorting out rooms we relaxed before going to the bus at the scheduled time of 18h45. Unfortunately the bus was not leaving until 19h30 but we were lucky enough to bump into one of the managers of Baleia Bay who was dropping of our breakfast packages. She gave us a lift to the venue and we enjoyed oysters on the half shell and did a barrel tasting of this years’ wines with the wine maker. The evening started at the wine cellar and moved to the restaurant for the dinner and speeches. This is a family run business and Fanie, the owner can be really proud of what his children have achieved. I am most looking forward to the bottling of the 2014 Shiraz and we will leave work earlier than usual when we head to Mossel Bay next so that we can stop in at La Bella when they are open. The tasting room is open Monday to Friday 09:00 – 17:00 and Saturday / Public Holidays 10:00 – 13:00. LaBella is open Monday to Friday 08:00 – 17:00, Saturday 08:00 – 15:00 and Sunday 08:00 – 16:00.

"La Bella Deli & Restaurant"

La Bella Deli & Restaurant

Disclosure: I was invited to the opening and the invitation was extended to Dave at my request. I was not asked to write a blog post in exchange for the invitation. This post is in line with my blogging policy.

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Recipe For Paris-Brest

In 2008 Dave and I visited Brittany and it was this trip that got me started on watching the annual Tour de France as that year they went through many of the places we had seen. Every year since then I have watched the Tour to see parts of France we would like to visit, and to see if I recognize landmarks we have been to on previous visits. I watch the Giro d’Italia for the same reason. However, this year I have watched the cycle races not only for the scenery, but also for the actual cycling. A lot of strategy goes into a cycle race, with the team picking the best riders for that particular race. One year you might need specialists in mountain climbing and another year you might need someone good at time trials. No matter what, I know that the cyclists are exhausted after long tours. The Paris-Brest race was originally run from Paris to Brest in Brittany and back to Paris. Just the thought of that makes me exhausted. The Paris-Brest pastry was created in 1891 to mark the first year that the race ended in Brest. The pastries are circular to resemble the wheels of the bicycle, and the high calorific count would have helped with replacing the calories the riders burnt up on the race. You might find the recipe length exhausting, but it is well worth the effort, and with all the preparation you are going to do, the calories will be much needed. For the purpose of making these Paris-Brest pastries I used a chocolate confectioners custard that I had in my freezer. I was really grateful for this as the first time I made the French butter cream it split. I had to go out and buy more ingredients to carry on, so having the custard already done saved me time. You will need to set aside the day to make these as everything has to be cold before you can assemble the Paris-Brest.

"Paris-Brest"

Paris-Brest

5.0 from 1 reviews
Recipe For Paris-Brest
 
These beautiful pastries are well worth the effort
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED:
Ingredients
for the praline
  • 25g sugar - I used fructose
  • 25g blanched almonds
for the choux pastry
  • 70mls water
  • Pinch of salt
  • 40g butter, cut into small cubes
  • 14g caster sugar - I used fructose
  • 80g flour
  • 2 eggs
for baking the Paris-Brest
  • 1 egg yolk, reserve the white for the Italian meringue
  • 25g flaked almonds, lightly toasted and crushed
for the confectioners custard
  • 125mls milk
  • 16g flour
  • 44g caster sugar - I used fructose
  • 4g butter
  • 1 egg
  • Pinch of salt
for the French butter cream
  • 50mls milk
  • 2 eggs
  • 50g caster sugar - I used fructose
  • 100g butter, cut into small cubes, and placed into a glass bowl
  • 40g praline
for the Italian meringue
  • 75g caster sugar - I used fructose
  • 25mls water
  • 1 egg white
Method
for the praline
  1. Place the nuts into a non stick frying pan and heat over a low temperature
  2. Place the sugar into a stainless steel frying pan
  3. Hear the sugar over a medium temperature until a caramel forms
  4. Add the nuts and stir quickly
  5. Pour out onto a silpat immediately
  6. Leave to cool
  7. Blitz in a food processor until fine
for the choux pastry
  1. Preheat the oven to 180° Celsius
  2. Place the water, salt, butter and sugar into a saucepan
  3. Heat on a medium temperature until the butter melts
  4. Increase the temperature and bring to the boil
  5. Remove from the heat and add the flour
  6. Mix quickly and return to the heat
  7. Stir on a medium temperature until the pastry pulls away from the sides
  8. Remove from the heat and leave to cool slightly
  9. Using a wooden spoon beat in the eggs until completely combined and the pastry is glossy
  10. Place the pastry into a piping bag with a 10mm nozzle
  11. Pipe into circles that are 7.5cm in diameter, you need to pipe 3 layers per circle
  12. Brush with the egg wash and sprinkle the top with the almonds
  13. Bake for 25 minutes
  14. Cool in the oven with the door open
  15. Remove and set aside until cold
for the confectioners custard
  1. Place the milk into a saucepan and bring to the boil
  2. Pour into a heatproof measuring jug
  3. Place the flour, sugar, butter, egg and salt into the saucepan and whisk
  4. Add the milk and stir well with a wooden spoon
  5. Return to the heat and boil for 2 minutes stirring constantly
  6. Pour into a glass bowl and place some cling film over the top to prevent a skin from forming
  7. Leave to get cold
for the French butter cream
  1. Place the milk into a saucepan and bring to the boil
  2. Place the eggs and the sugar into a bowl and whisk until ribbon stage
  3. Pour the milk over the egg mixture, whisking continuously
  4. Return to the heat on a medium temperature
  5. Stir constantly with a wooden spoon until you get a thick custard
  6. Pour over the butter, and whisk by hand until the butter has been incorporated
  7. Leave to cool before adding the praline
for the Italian meringue
  1. Place the sugar and water into a saucepan
  2. Heat on a medium temperature until soft ball stage (116° Celsius)
  3. Place the egg white into a stand mixer and whisk until stiff
  4. Add the syrup slowly, whisking continuously
  5. Continue whisking until the meringue is cold
for the Paris-Brest
  1. Cut the choux rings in half horizontally
  2. Mix together the confectioners custard, French butter cream and Italian meringue
  3. Place into a piping bag with a large star nozzle
  4. Pipe the mixture onto the bottom half of the choux rings
  5. Replace the top half and enjoy
Cooks Notes
The meringue will keep in the fridge

Click on the links for conversions and notes.

"Paris-Brest Pastries"

Paris-Brest Pastries

Blog-checking lines: The November Daring Baker’s challenge took us for a ride! Luisa from Rise of the Sourdough Preacher challenged us to make Paris-Brest, a beautiful pastry celebrating the Paris-Brest bicycle race.

"Paris-Brest With Chocolate Confectioners Custard"

Paris-Brest With Chocolate Confectioners Custard

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Recipe For Gooi & Enjoy™ Salad

Gooi & Enjoy™ is a Meal Dice Challenge created by PaperKutz and I was one of the lucky recipients of a set of these dice, together with a R100 Pick N Pay gift card voucher, a wooden spoon and a spoon rest. From this post here you can read in the comments that the spoon holder is by far the most amazing new item in my kitchen.

"Spoon Holder"

Spoon Holder

The dice come in a tin mug and consist of 5 basic dice for proteins, carbohydrates, herbs, an extra ingredient and cooking methods. There are 4 additional dice, one for each season of the year.

"Gooi & Enjoy™"

Gooi & Enjoy™

This South African created product will help you decide what to cook for dinner, using fresh ingredients. If you are a fan of the mystery basket in Master Chef, or Chopped, then these dice are for you. The idea is to roll the 5 basic dice, plus the seasonal vegetable dice and then cook dinner. I chose to use the spring and summer vegetable dice as we are sitting on the cusp of the two seasons, with spring vegetables slowly making their way out, and summer vegetables making their way in. Here was my roll of the Gooi & Enjoy™ dice.

"Gooi & Enjoy™ dice'

Gooi & Enjoy™ dice

Tasked to Create, Cook and Enjoy I made a cous cous salad for dinner. I was really challenged as I would ordinarily pan fry my chicken fillets! So, the dice achieved something for me as promised, they reinvigorated my cooking routine and made food fun!

"Gooi & Enjoy™ Cous Cous Salad"

Gooi & Enjoy™ Cous Cous Salad

4.7 from 3 reviews
Cous Cous Salad
 
A perfect salad for a warm summer evening.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED:
Ingredients
for the cous cous
  • 95g cous cous
  • 5mls oregano oil
  • Salt to season
  • 250mls boiling water
for the salad
  • Salted boiling water in the bottom pot of your steamer
  • 2 skinless, chicken breast fillets
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper to season
  • 10mls Dijon mustard
  • 4 sprigs fresh oreganum, divided
  • Corn off 1 cob
  • 4 baby marrows, thickly sliced
  • 8 baby tomatoes, quartered
for the vinaigrette
  • 45mls oregano oil
  • 15mls champagne vinegar
  • 1 clove garlic, crushed
  • 5mls Dijon mustard
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper to season
Method
for the cous cous
  1. Place the cous cous into a bowl
  2. Add the oil and the salt and mix with a fork
  3. Pour in the boiling water
  4. Cover with cling film and set aside until the water is absorbed
  5. Fluff the grains with a fork
for the salad
  1. Get your water boiling and set a steamer on top of the pot
  2. Season the chicken breast
  3. Brush on the mustard
  4. Pick the leaves off 2 sprigs and sprinkle onto the chicken breasts
  5. Steam for 12 minutes with a lid on the steamer
  6. Remove and set aside to rest before slicing
  7. Add the corn and 2 of the sprigs into the water
  8. Steam the baby marrows while cooking the corn for 3 minutes
  9. Drain the corn and set the corn and marrows aside
  10. Season the vegetables and toss into the cous cous, with the chicken
for the vinaigrette
  1. Mix all the ingredients together and dress the salad while still warm

Click on the links for conversions and notes.

Disclosure: I was sent the dice which retail at R190 per set, to keep and review. This post is in line with my blogging policy.

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Recipe For Lemon, Lime And Bitters

My friend Kim lives in Perth and I have been very fortunate to have been able to visit her to see where she lives. The first time I was there she drank lemon, lime and bitters, which I had never heard of before. I love the name of the drink but not having ever tasted it as it has sucrose, I had to use my imagination to create something at home. Traditionally this is a drink made with lemonade, lime cordial and Angostura bitters. I love bitters in my gin and tonics, and even just in plain soda water as a refreshing change to what I drink. Being on a cordial kick at present I decided to make a cordial using the ingredients as suggested by the name lemon, lime and bitters, rather than what the drink should be made of. The result was the most addictive cordial I have ever tasted. I mixed it into my water bottle at a ratio far higher than what I normally would do, and I could not get enough! It is sweet and tangy and very syrupy. I am looking forward to summer weather, and using this to flavour an ice cold G&T.

"Lemon, Lime And Bitters"

Lemon, Lime And Bitters

 

5.0 from 2 reviews
Lemon, Lime And Bitters
 
This cordial mix is so amazing, you will find any excuse to have a drink to use it.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED:
Ingredients
  • Juice and zest of 1 lemon
  • Juice and zest of 1 lime
  • Sugar - I used fructose
  • 10 dashes Angasturo bitters (or more to taste)
Method
  1. Juice the lemon and lime into a measuring jug and make a note of the mls
  2. Place into a saucepan
  3. Weigh the sugar to be the same as the juice (i.e. if the juice measures 100mls you need 100g sugar)
  4. Add to the juice and place the saucepan on a high heat
  5. Stir to dissolve and then bring to the boil
  6. Reduce the heat and simmer for 5 minutes
  7. Remove from the heat and add the zest
  8. Leave to cool
  9. Add the bitters and stir
  10. Place into a sterilized glass bottle
  11. Store in the fridge
  12. Strain into a glass with water or soda water, adding enough for your taste buds, I like mine strong
Cooks Notes
Reduce the sugar by 10% if you don't want it sweet. This makes a very syrupy cordial.

Click on the links for conversions and notes.

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Out And About: Friday 21 November 2014

Dave and I headed to Mossel Bay to spend the night at Aqua Marina before going to Sedgefield to have lunch with my mother-in-law. That evening we had supper at Route 57 and the following morning we headed out and about to the Outeniqua Farmers’ Market. We had wanted to get oysters but the ladies were not there. We did however get some amazing blue cheese and a very ripe brie cheese as well as some bread.

"Outeniqua Farmers' Market"

Outeniqua Farmers’ Market

As we had not found everything we needed for lunch at the Outeniqua Farmers’ Market we stopped off at Wild Oats which in my opinion is the best farmers’ market in the country. We bought fresh blueberries and ready trimmed strawberries as well as some cured meat. After shopping we had a single espresso and then headed off to lunch.

"Wild Oats"

Wild Oats

On the 16th we went to the Food & Wine Affair at Lourensford Wine Estate. (I was given tickets courtesy of Checkers from Go4Word PR). I had hoped that the farmers market would be open but sadly it wasn’t. We did a few wine tastings and I bought 6 bottles of the Lourensford Merlot 2011 as well as a bottle of the MCC rosé that was on special for the show. We arrived early and spent a very short time there but it looked like it was a great day out for the whole family. We found a few new wine estates to try, one being La Bri in Franschhoek which showcases their wines in relation to local flowers. I cannot wait to visit them at the estate.

"Food & Wine Affair"

Food & Wine Affair

Disclaimer: I was given two tickets for the Food & Wine Affair but I was not asked to blog about the event. This post is in line with my blogging policy.

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Tandy

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Recipe For Tarragon Vinegar

It is so sad when a decision you make for your own well being, ends up being sour for others. Shortly before we left for overseas we told one of the friends we were going with, who was the person we had organized the trip for, that we did not want to go with them on the barge. The reason had nothing to do with him, his wife, or the other couple they had invited along and were paying for. The reason had everything to do with a person who would be on a barge alongside us. Our friend had paid for this person, his wife, and another couple and we felt that as we had paid for ourselves, we should not be subjected to spending the time with someone we do not like, and do not trust. Our friend assured us that there would be no problem and that he would be told to stay away from us. Of course, he ignored this, and we ended up leaving the barge. On the surface everything seemed OK between Dave and our friend, but sadly, it isn’t. He arrived late for David’s birthday party, using the rugby as an excuse and came around as usual the following Tuesday night. We go there every Sunday for a drink, but the next Sunday he did not answer his phone, and said he was at gym. The following Tuesday he was away but two more Tuesdays have passed and he has not been to us, and Dave has not called him for our regular Sunday drinks. I am so saddened by this, as he is a good friend and my decision to leave the barge has resulted in this awful feeling.

Vinegar, when tasted alone leaves a sour taste in your mouth. But when added to a salad dressing can be sweet. I wish I knew what to add to this sour situation to change it around and make it good again. I made this tarragon vinegar shortly before my tarragon died back. We had such an interesting winter weather wise that the tarragon was only gone from my garden for about 6 weeks. I love the aniseed flavour of the herb and use it mostly with chicken.

"Tarragon Vinegar"

Tarragon Vinegar

 

5.0 from 1 reviews
Tarragon Vinegar
 
An easy vinegar to make using any herb of your choice
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED:
Ingredients
  • 20 fresh tarragon leaves
  • 100mls white wine vinegar
Method
  1. Lightly crush the tarragon leaves
  2. Place into a sterilized glass bottle
  3. Top with the vinegar
  4. Leave to infuse for a week before using

Click on the links for conversions and notes.

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