Recipe For Cinnamon Ice Cream

Cinnamon Ice Cream Recipe For Cinnamon Ice Cream

Cinnamon Ice Cream

I have read every single one of Sam Woulidge’s Confessions of a Hungry Woman columns in the Taste Magazine. She has published a book with the same name, and some of her articles have been included in the book. When reading ‘in good faith’ (page 50/1) Sam talks about memories in taste. When she wrote this, her mom was still alive and so she spoke of her grandparents and aunts and uncles. Sadly, Sam’s mom passed away and so I headed to twitter and asked her what taste would her mom’s memory be? Her reply “Butter. I find my mom in butter. And especially bottereiers“. When reading this in English I wondered what French dish bottereiers could be, and then I read that word in Afrikaans and realized Sam was talking about ‘butter eggs’ (the literal translation) or what I would call scrambled eggs. Made with a healthy knob of butter, scrambled eggs to me are lazy Sunday morning spent breakfasting in bed, something Sam is not so keen on. Sam is multilingual, a talented writer, mother to Labrador Retriever’s and the most beautiful son, Sebastian. Sam’s use of Afrikaans in her English sentences shows her true love for language. She reminisces in her articles written away from home about melk tert and summer days. So, when thinking of Sam in tastes I had to make something special for her with cinnamon. And not just cinnamon, the taste of milk tarts, but cinnamon ice cream laced with dulce de leche.

Cinnamon Ice Cream With Dulce De Leche Recipe For Cinnamon Ice Cream

Cinnamon Ice Cream With Dulce De Leche

Cinnamon Ice Cream
 
This ice cream has the most beautiful, distinct cinnamon flavour.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED:
Ingredients
  • 250mls milk
  • 1 cinnamon quill
  • 5 egg yolks
  • 80g sugar - I used fructose
  • 250mls cream
Method
  1. Place the milk and the cinnamon into a medium sized sauce pan
  2. Over a medium heat bring up to blood temperature
  3. Place the egg yolks and sugar into a mixing bowl
  4. Whisk until they have reached the ribbon stage
  5. Whisk in the milk
  6. Add this mixture back into the sauce pan, with the cream and the cinnamon
  7. Stir over a medium heat with a wooden spoon until a custard forms
  8. Strain into a bowl and leave the cinnamon in the custard
  9. Allow to cool before refrigerating overnight
  10. Remove the cinnamon quill
  11. Churn in an ice cream maker according to the manufacturer’s instructions
  12. Freeze for at least 4 hours before serving

 

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Cinnamon Ice Cream For Sam Recipe For Cinnamon Ice Cream

Cinnamon Ice Cream For Sam

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The Cake Book, Cupcake Jemma

The Cake Book forms part of Jamie Oliver’s series of Food Tube books and is written by Jemma Wilson, better known as Cupcake Jemma. Jemma is the owner of Crumbs and Doilies and in her book she has given us 50 recipes, 10 basics and 10 for each season.

The Cake Book The Cake Book, Cupcake Jemma

The Cake Book

Jemma’s key tips to baking are patience, determination and a “willingness to keep trying”. The book starts off with hints and tips for decorating, ingredients and equipment. The basics include recipes for various cupcakes, a chocolate ganache (p22) and meringues (p24). Spring recipes on my list are green tea cupcakes with sesame brittle (p46) and pistachio, lime and cardamom cake (p52). Summer recipes to try include rosemary, honey and yoghurt loaf (p64) and super-lemony meringue cake (p70). For autumn, spiced pumpkin cupcakes (p86) are appropriate as well as bonfire cupcakes (p98). In winter one must make hot toddy cupcakes (p106) and a ridiculous chocolate cake (p114) to celebrate the holidays. Despite our seasons being different to the UK I think I will make Christmas puds (p124) as Jemma describes them as being perfect party treats and this year we have been invited to a Christmas party.

Lavender Caramel Cupcakes The Cake Book, Cupcake Jemma

Lavender Caramel Cupcakes

Even though this book was sent to me by Penguin Books South Africa to review, I am not allowed to publish a recipe from the book due to it being an international publication. I did however test the recipe for lavender caramel cupcakes (p72) making the lavender infused milk (p32) with my lavender and rooibos tea. The infused milk recipe calls for 200mls of milk, and the cupcake recipe uses 45mls of the milk, so I made some ice cream with the rest of the milk which my step son referred to as ‘interesting’. The lavender caramel is an adaptation of the salted caramel (p28) recipe and I am going to adapt this recipe for sure. I made half of the recipe as is my norm, and it made 8 cupcakes where the recipe states it will make 24. I also halved the recipe for the buttercream icing and I have a lot left over. I have frozen it hoping that with some gentle defrosting I can use it again as it was very tasty! As you can see, my piping skills need some work. This is a great book for anyone wanting to add a few new cupcake recipes to their repertoire.

First published by the Penguin Group in 2014

ISBN number 978-0-718-17920-5

Paperback – 127 pages

Disclaimer: I was sent the book to review by Penguin Books South Africa. I was not required to write a positive review. This post is in line with my blogging policy.

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Recipe For Citrus Liqueur

Yesterday after shopping I came home in need of a drink! I purchased several items from my local store but found them more than 20% cheaper at their opposition, and so took them back for credit. One of the items was a probiotic and I was told by the ladies at the returns counter that they do not take back medication. There is no sign where I purchased the probiotics, nor was it indicated on my slip that I could not return them. The pharmacist came to explain to me that there is a sign at the pharmacy that states I may not bring back medication. I told her that as the vitamin section is not part of the pharmacy I did not see the sign. She said that the health section is part of the pharmacy. I then explained that I do not have to pay for vitamins, health supplements and various unscheduled medications at the pharmacy but I do have to pay for scheduled medication at the pharmacy, so how was I supposed to know they were part of the same section? Her response was to ask me “How would you like it if someone from Kyalitsha returned something and then you bought it?” Kyalitsha is an area inhabited by people mostly living in sub economic informal settlements and who are either Black or Coloured. Her assumption was because I am white, I cannot live in Kyalitsha. Sadly, poverty is colour blind and her comment was racist. She also assumed that people living in this area would tamper with medication and vitamins. Surely if this is the case, they could tamper with any edible product and return it? And frankly, area does not determine this type of behaviour and if the concern is that edible products might be tampered with then they should not take anything edible back. Once I pointed out to her that her assumption was offensive she became defensive and would not listen to my argument. I have been told by the store security that I may not write down prices to compare them and so buying them and then comparing them and then returning them if I can get them cheaper elsewhere is my only option. The more I rationalized why I should be allowed to return the items the more defensive she became, before eventually storming off as I was not leaving till I got my money back! Thankfully the store manager agreed with me and the refund was done, but the exacerbation levels were still high. Hence, the need for a drink! Which, by the way, I did not have. But had I had something to drink when I got home it would have been my citrus liqueur which I started making on the 18th of July and decanted on the 17th of September. It is not too sweet and does not have an alcoholic after taste and is, in my opinion, a great after shopping dinner drink.

Do you have a liqueur you like to drink after a meal?

Citrus Liqueur During Fermentation Recipe For Citrus Liqueur

Citrus Liqueur During Fermentation

 

5.0 from 1 reviews
Citrus Liqueur
 
In just 2 months you can have a not too sweet and not too alcoholic after dinner drink to enjoy.
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED:
Ingredients
  • 5 oranges, tangerines, or any sweet citrus fruit of your choice, washed
  • 375g sugar - I used fructose
  • 1 stalk lemongrass, slightly bruised
  • 1 stalk rosemary
  • 750mls Brandy
Method
  1. Zest the fruit and set the zest aside
  2. Juice the fruit and place the juice into a large jar
  3. Add the sugar and stir until it dissolved
  4. Add the zest, the lemongrass and the rosemary
  5. Add the Brandy and stir
  6. Put the lid on the jar and leave to macerate for 2 months
  7. Strain through a coffee filter into a sterilized glass bottle
  8. Seal and store in a cool place
  9. Enjoy!

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Citrus Liqueur Recipe For Citrus Liqueur

Citrus Liqueur

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Recipe For Labneh

In June I received my issue of Taste Magazine. I have subscribed for 11 years and was debating whether or not to cancel my subscription as I only really read the magazine for my friend Sam Woulidge’s column. However, when I found the recipe for Labneh on page 54 I decided I would renew my subscription as finally I had a recipe to try! Well, the recipe for labneh proved to be easy, but renewing my subscription was not! I clicked on the link to renew my subscription by paying with a credit card and it was not until my statement had arrived and the next issue of the magazine had not arrived did I see that the charge had not gone off my card. For some reason, the charge was declined – and this had nothing to do with there not being enough credit available. I tried again to make the payment with my credit card – and I used all four to no avail, each one being declined. It seems as if RNA had some issue and so I gave up. But, I did not give in! I decided to call on the lovely team at Taste Magazine to see if they could help me. They did not know how to resolve the issue with regard to credit card payments, but they made sure I would receive the next 11 issues of the magazine by gifting them to me. I have just collected the 100th issue – well done Taste team on such a fantastic achievement, and such a wonderful gift.

Labneh Coated In ZaAtar Recipe For Labneh

Labneh Coated In Za’Atar

 

Labneh
 
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED:
Ingredients
  • 500g Greek yoghurt
  • Za'Atar for garnish
  • Olive oil for drizzling
Method
  1. Place a sieve over a bowl
  2. Line the sieve with muslin
  3. Pour the yoghurt into the muslin
  4. Make a ball of the yoghurt, using the muslin and secure the top tightly
  5. Place into the fridge overnight
  6. The next day transfer the yoghurt to a dry piece of muslin and repeat the process
  7. Once the yoghurt has firmed up scoop a tablespoon measure at a time and form balls while rolling in the za'atar
  8. Drizzle with olive oil to serve
Cooks Notes
If you don't have muslin use a kitchen cloth. Place the extras into a sterilized glass jar and top with olive oil

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Buying Frying Pans

The amount and type of frying pans available are numerous and can be quite overwhelming. In this post I hope to help you with what I consider to be essential, and what I consider to be a luxury. If you are starting out then I can highly recommend that you spend your money once, and buy the best. I have Le Creuset and Scanpan frying pans at home and the quality is what counts. They will last a lifetime! The first frying pan on your list should be something versatile and that you can use for anything and everything. A large non stick frying pan is perfect for meat, making eggs and crêpes.

Le Creuset Toughened Non Stick Deep Frying Pan Buying Frying Pans

Le Creuset Toughened Non-Stick Deep Frying Pan

Next I would get a stainless steel sauté pan that has a lid. This can be used for getting a lovely brown colour on your proteins, as well as cooking clams and mussels. I have both a lidded and non lidded stainless steel frying pan.

Scanpan Impact Stainless Steel Frypan Buying Frying Pans

Scanpan Impact Stainless Steel Frypan

Now that you have the two basic frying pans you can slowly add to your collection. I have an oval shaped non stick frying pan for frying fish and a cast iron flat crêpe pan which I can also use for crumpets. My most recent purchase has been an omelette pan which is non stick and is perfect for a 4 egg omelette. I use it to make scrambled eggs and it fits perfectly into my oven.

Le Creuset 3 Ply Non Stick Omelette Pan Buying Frying Pans

Le Creuset 3 Ply Non-Stick Omelette Pan

You should not need more than this to make your collection of frying pans complete.

Disclaimer: I have been given permission to use these images from yuppiechef.com and a big thank you goes the Yuppiechef team for this! This post is in line with my blogging policy.

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Blog ♥: I have been so inspired by Joanne who Eats Well With Others and her concept of sharing links from bloggers around the world that I am going to do the same here, when I can find link love to share. Thanks Joanne for letting me ‘steal’ your idea icon smile Buying Frying Pans

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In My Kitchen November 2014

Each month Celia from Fig Jam And Lime Cordial hosts bloggers who share their in my kitchen posts. Usually I manage to read each and every single one of them but in September I was too busy scheduling my blog posts for while we were in France, and in October I have been busy catching up on the bloggers who I read on a regular basis. Hopefully this month I will be able to peek into a lot more kitchens! Thank you if you are here taking a look into my kitchen!

My mom sent me a birthday present just before we flew overseas. I have paged through and drooled over many of the recipes and have put it aside to work through in December. Next month we will be on leave and I plan on getting through my do to list then.

Choclatique In My Kitchen November 2014

Choclatique

When we are in France we always buy duck liver pâté. Please do not read fois gras and be offended. This is not liver from force fed ducks. My blog ethos is about sustainability, and just like we eat chicken livers, we also eat duck livers. This  pâté is amazing and perfect for a lunch time treat.

Duck Liver Pâté In My Kitchen November 2014

Duck Liver Pâté

Last month I hosted a give away on behalf of Le Creuset for CANSA. Part of the lovely gifts I received included this fridge magnet.

Magnet In My Kitchen November 2014

Magnet

In Paris we went to a visit to the Maille boutique store. I am in love with mustard and all the flavours we saw and we came home with only 3 bottles. I am so going back next year for some other flavours.

Mustard In My Kitchen November 2014

Mustard

When we were in Nevers we went into a chocolatier and Dave bought himself a pastry which was beautifully packaged in a box. I chose some 100% chocolate which I shall use to make chocolates when next I have time.

Pascal Caffet In My Kitchen November 2014

Pascal Caffet

There is a new product on the market called gooi & enjoy. For those of you who do not speak Afrikaans, gooi translates to throw. It is a set of meal dice to use as inspiration for cooking. I will be reviewing the dice soon, but in the meantime I am showing off the wooden spoon that was made for me.

Wooden Spoon In My Kitchen November 2014

Wooden Spoon

I also received a fantastic spoon holder which is so useful. It fits perfectly onto my butcher’s block and does not slip and slide away. I love that it is flat and easy to clean and the saying on it – just perfect!

Spoon Holder In My Kitchen November 2014

Spoon Holder

We visited Sancerre while we were on the barge and the visit necessitated 2 taxi trips. While Dave was waiting for the taxi to bring me, he went into the tourism office. Together with a map of the village, he bought this wine opener. I will use it and remember what was our great last morning on the barge and our visit to the amazing museum in Sancerre.

Wine Opener In My Kitchen November 2014

Wine Opener

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The Bootlegger, Clive Cussler

The Bootlegger opening line: Two men in expensive clothes, a bootlegger and his bodyguard, dangled a bellboy upside down from the Hotel Gotham’s parapet.

The Bootlegger The Bootlegger, Clive Cussler

The Bootlegger

This collaboration with Justin Scott has not been my favourite Clive Cussler book. I am not sure if this had something to do with the topic of the Prohibition in America, or if it was the actual writing. Dave also did not enjoy this book so I am not going to recommend it unless you have an obsession with the period of time.

The book is about Prohibition and the lengths people would take to get alcohol into the country. Coupled with that is the secondary plot of the Russians trying to destroy capitalism and instil communism into the country. Of course, the way they see to do this is to become rum runners themselves.

First published in the United States of America by G.P. Putnam’s Sons in 2014

ISBN number 978-1-405-91434-5

Paperback – 403 pages

Disclaimer: I was sent the book to review by Penguin Books South Africa. I was not required to write a positive review. This post is in line with my blogging policy.

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Food Gifts You Can Make at Home

Disclaimer: I have received payment for this post and the text and photograph have been provided to me. This post is in line with my blogging policy.

Now is a great time to make food gifts that you can give as Christmas presents. As the growing season comes to an end there is plenty of fruit and vegetables that you simply have too much of. Old fashioned cooking has been making a big return and one of the harvest time cooking tasks of old was to make preserves.

Food from the Allotment

With the resurgence of old fashioned cooking has come the desire to grow your own fruit and vegetables. Allotments have also seen a big come back and the varieties that you might find on today’s allotments may have changed a bit. While some people still grow the traditional potatoes, carrots, onions, cabbage and beans (and there’s still a place for these) you might also find more exotic vegetables like yams or okra. Of course, it’s personal choice what you grow – it all depends on the food you like to eat. Inevitably there will sometimes be a glut. Runner beans have done exceptionally well this year and you can usually find some being sold at a very reasonable price outside the allotments.

What to do with all this Produce?

Without doubt, anyone who has grown runner beans this year has just about had their fill of them. Modern technology means we can freeze down a lot of our produce to use throughout the year. But there’s no fun in that and you can’t give a bag of frozen beans as a present at Christmas! How about making jars of runner bean chutney? This is sure to be a gift that thrills your friends and family and it’s not the sort of thing that you can readily find in the shops. Make a selection of chutneys and jams and you can put them together to make a charming gift that has extra meaning because it’s home-made.

I can’t grow Veg!

Not everyone has access to allotments or has the ability or desire to grow their own vegetables. You can buy fruit and vegetables when they are in season so that you can make your own jams or chutneys but you may not have the time to do it. All is not lost as there are a number of purveyors of luxury food gifts that have done the job for you.

The essence of a Christmas Food Gift

Whether you are making your own or collecting some food items to give as a gift put some thought into it so that the recipient gets a gift they will remember. Here are a few tips to help you create the perfect gift:

  • Mix your own home produce with a gourmet item like the ones you can find at http://www.maille.co.uk/online-boutique/gifts.list
  • Give the ingredients for a favourite recipe
  • Make up a winter picnic basket and include your chutneys and some mustard to warm things up
  • Make your gift look attractive by adding gingham cloth fabric lids to your jars and lining a basket with the same cloth
  • Make a cheese and wine hamper and include chutneys and mustard

It doesn’t matter if you use your own produce or buy speciality produce to make up your own gift. As they always say, it’s the thought that counts so make sure your gift will be special to the person it’s intended for.

Food Gifts You Can Make at Home Food Gifts You Can Make at Home

Food Gifts You Can Make at Home

Image courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net/Simon Howden

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Recipe For Za’Atar

In 1985 I visited Israel and everywhere I looked I could see army personnel. They would walk around in a group of 3, with bullet proof vests and sub machine guns at the ready. This was an expected sight as the country is always in a state of war, whether actively or just waiting for one to happen. In 1991 I saw the same level of army presence in Singapore and as I was travelling alone, I found this of great comfort. In Switzerland, Italy and France you see the army patrolling the streets and frankly, I do not even blink an eyelid when I see this. There is a feeling of safety and security and the police carry some weight, making crime seem impossible. In South Africa, crime is everywhere. It is creeping closer and closer to where I live, with our local shopping mall having been the most recent target of a cash in transit heist. I think it is about time we deploy the army to patrol our streets and shopping centres. They should be armed and ready to shoot and anyone who pulls out a gun should expect to be killed. It is about time that the people in charge of this country took control so that we can feel safe and secure in what to me is still the most beautiful place on earth.

Something else I ‘witnessed’ for the first time in Israel, was the use of the spice blend Za’Atar. I am sure every household has its own recipe, and I used mine to coat some labneh. These middle eastern treats are easy to make at home, and no matter where you live, you will be able to experience the beautiful creamy fresh cheese with this spice blend. I used the left over Za’Atar to season a chicken I was roasting for a family dinner.

Does the army patrol the area where you live?

Labneh Coated In ZaAtar Recipe For ZaAtar

Labneh Coated In Za’Atar

Za'Atar
 
Za'Atar is a herb blend made mainly from fresh oregano and is used in middle eastern cooking.
Ingredients
  • 20mls toasted sesame seeds
  • 60mls loosely packed fresh oregano leaves
  • 20mls dried marjoram
  • 25mls sumac
  • 5mls salt
  • 10mls ground cumin
  • 5mls dried thyme
Method
  1. Place all of the ingredients into a spice blender and blitz until smooth
  2. Store in a sterilized glass jar and use as needed

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Le Mesturet, Paris

I cannot remember where I saw the recommendation for Le Mesturet in Paris, but as it was only a 20 minute walk from where we were staying, it seemed like the perfect place to go for dinner. Having returned from the Burgundy region, we chose a carafe of Bourgogne Pinot Noir Bader Mimer to drink. The wine was slightly acidic, with a distinct nose of red berries.

Le Mesturet Le Mesturet, Paris

Le Mesturet

We did not have starters as we had had a late lunch and I chose the fresh cod with home made aioli for my dinner. Despite it being served on a cold plate, the meal was perfect with just the right level of garlic. My cod was served with periwinkles, which I teased out of their shells with a fork. A hat pin would have been a good idea. Dave chose the fricassee of Beliac lamb which was served with an olive, tomato and lemon compote. The lamb was tender and moist and flavoursome. Both of the plates came with streamed seasonal vegetables. We decided to have dessert at a local ice cream place, so our visit was short and sweet. The coffee is good and you will find the staff most helpful and able to speak English fairly well.

Le Mesturet is situated at 77 Rue de Richeliue in Paris and is open 7 days a week from 12h00 to 23h00. Prices are reasonable and the restaurant is worth a visit. Contact them on +33 (0)1 42 97 40 68 and I would recommend that you make a reservation as they were pretty full on the Sunday evening when we went.

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