Recipe For Choc Chip Scones

It seems my blog has a small problem. My post for Sunday did not push itself through and my saved post for Choc Chip Scones published in the unedited format. So, this is the one that was meant to be live yesterday! Thank you Mandy for the heads up!

This year for International Scone Week hosted by Celia from Fig Jam And Lime Cordial I have chosen to make Choc Chip Scones using the cocoa nibs I bought a few months back. I used a recipe from Paul Hollywood’s 100 Great Breads and once again I had a few problems with the recipe. I had to add more flour but this might have been due to the fact that I chose to use up the spelt flour I had in my fridge. I was also amazed at how much baking powder the recipe uses but it did not leave a residual taste and so I can only say that yes, you need that much baking powder! The recipe told me to roll out the dough to 5cm (and as Tanya pointed out, 5″ is not 2cm as I had in the original post!). I checked all his scone recipes and they all say 5cm but I chose to roll it out thinner. I also had to bake the scones for longer than in the recipe but this could be all to do with my oven and the flour I used, as each flour reacts a different way. These might not look like ordinary, normal scones on the inside, but they taste and smell and look like scones on the outside.

Choc Chip Scones Recipe For Choc Chip Scones

Choc Chip Scones

Choc Chip Scones

Adapted from Paul Hollywood's 100 Great Breads page 32

Ingredients:

  • 350g bread flour, plus extra for dusting
  • 200g spelt flour
  • 2 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 75g caster sugar - I used fructose
  • 30g baking powder
  • 75g butter
  • 230mls milk
  • 50g cacao nibs or chocolate chips
  • egg wash

Method:

  • Place the flour, eggs, sugar, baking powder, butter and milk into a stand mixer bowl
  • Beat on a low speed for 2 minutes
  • Mix in the cacao nibs by hand
  • Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface
  • Roll out to 2cm thick and cut rounds using a cutter or glass
  • Place these onto a lined baking tray
  • Brush the tops with egg wash and place into the fridge for 30 minutes
  • Preheat the oven to 220° Celsius
  • Brush the tops with egg wash taking care not to let it dribble down the sides
  • Bake for 20 minutes
  • Cool on a wire rack and serve warm
http://tandysinclair.com/choc-chip-scones/
 Recipe For Choc Chip Scones

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International Scone Week 2014 Recipe For Choc Chip Scones

International Scone Week 2014

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Recipe For Horseradish Dressing

When we were in Wales I had the best horseradish sauce that I have ever tasted. I could eat horseradish raw and would do so if I could find this here where we live. In fact, I have only once seen horseradish in Somerset West. I took this photograph with my cell phone and used some of the horseradish that I bought to make chrain, a relish served traditionally with gefilte fish.

Horseradish Recipe For Horseradish Dressing

Horseradish

In Wales, my roast beef was served with horseradish sauce and it is the perfect accompaniment in my opinion! I so wanted to replicate the flavour of the horseradish when we got home and so I made this horseradish dressing. I used palm sugar as I am also busy experimenting with making sucrose free meringues and had grated a lot of palm sugar to use for that. You can use any sweetener of your choice. The store bought horseradish I have says ‘hot’ on the bottle but I find it to be still quite mild. My next aim is to try and grow my own horseradish, it I can just find some seeds.

Horseradish Dressing Recipe For Horseradish Dressing

Horseradish Dressing

Horseradish Dressing

Ingredients:

  • 5g fresh tarragon leaves
  • 100g yoghurt
  • Zest and juice of 1 lemon
  • 30mls olive oil
  • 10mls horseradish sauce
  • 10mls ground palm sugar
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper to season

Method:

  • Place the tarragon, yoghurt, lemon juice and zest, oil, horseradish and palm sugar into a blender
  • Blend until completely mixed
  • Season to taste

Cooks Notes:

I added this to 700g steamed baby potatoes to make a delicious potato salad

http://tandysinclair.com/horseradish-dressing/
 Recipe For Horseradish Dressing

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Writing A Restaurant Review

What qualifies someone to review a restaurant? Well, in my opinion anyone who eats at an establishment and pays for the meal can review the experience. This review would therefore be totally independent. There are many places that restaurants are reviewed and I often read TripAdvisor when looking for a restaurant. I know that the reviews can be skewed but I take an overall impression to see whether we should eat there or not. I also read based on my expectations, and not the expectations of the person eating there. For example, a person might complain that a restaurant does not cater for children, but for us that is a plus.

The Kitchin Writing A Restaurant Review

The Kitchin

I love sharing my experiences through my blog and I am sure my reviews are more than qualified. I spent eight years working professionally in restaurants and I have self published a recipe book. Further I consider myself an accomplished cook and I have high expectations. I know what tastes good (to me) and I know what works and what does not. I can understand how service should be and what to expect from timing in a restaurant.

© The Wine Writing A Restaurant Review

© The Wine

But what I think most qualifies me to share my experiences is the fact that I have eaten at top restaurants since I was a young child. I have been exposed to top chefs and top restaurants all over the world. My earliest memory is eating at Gatrilles in Johannesburg and I have relocated my passion for their food by eating often at 96 Winery Road. I love the restaurant at Waterkloof and I am prepared to pay the premium to eat at a decent restaurant.

96 Winery Road Writing A Restaurant Review

96 Winery Road

I prefer to review here on my blog and found the experience of reviewing for a magazine quite challenging. Your words are restricted and there is always the possibility of editorial conflict. A restaurant I rate highly may not be the favourite of the editor, and a restaurant I did not enjoy might have too high a ranking to receive a negative review.

c2a9 waterkloof Writing A Restaurant Review

© Waterkloof

When blogging about a restaurant one of the most important issues is to let your reader know if you were an invited guest. If you were, you might have received extra ordinary service and attention. I also feel that the review should be based on your own personal experience of the restaurant. List the good with the bad and be fair and honest in your review.

The Tilted Wig Writing A Restaurant Review

The Tilted Wig

Let your readers know how they can contact the restaurant and give them as much information as possible to make a realistic choice as to whether they should eat there or not. My style of reviewing is constantly evolving. I leave reviews up even if the restaurant has closed or changed hands, and I try and update the reviews when I can if we have been back to a restaurant.

Pomegranate Restaurant Writing A Restaurant Review

Pomegranate Restaurant

What to you is the most important facet of reading a restaurant review that influences your decision to eat there or not?

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Recipe For Bara Brith

When watching The Great British menu a few years ago Bryn Williams made Bara Brith for his dessert. This traditional Welsh cake was the first thing that I ordered when we had morning coffee in Little Haven in Pembrokeshire, Wales. It is a spiced fruit cake and really tasty. As soon as we were home I looked through all of my recipe books to find a recipe for Bara Brith. I prefer to use my recipe books as I have paid for them and need to get some use from the recipe book, other than getting the writer to sign them for me. I turned to Brian Turner’s Favourite British Recipes and followed his recipe for Bara Brith (page 175) to the tee, using up the last of my fresh yeast. The first stage worked quite well, given the fact that I had to use my heater to prove the dough as it was a really cold day, but the second stage proved to be a total disaster. A dough did not form with the addition of the liquid ingredients, and instead I had a nice batter. Rather than shaping this into a round tin as per the method listed, I poured the batter into a loaf tin and proceeded to bake it for the required time. This resulted in a not completely cooked spiced loaf, which I cut up and dried into rusks. I then turned to the internet and found this recipe. It worked perfectly, and the Bara Brith lasted a week. We toasted some and had it with jam which was perfect for an afternoon tea time treat.

Do you order traditional cakes when you are travelling?

Bara Brith Recipe For Bara Brith

Bara Brith

Bara Brith

Recipe adapted from Visit Wales

Ingredients:

  • 1 black tea tea bag - I used vanilla tea
  • 225mls boiling water
  • 300g raisins
  • 150g currants
  • 75mls whisky
  • 450g self raising flour
  • 5mls mixed spice
  • 175g Muscavado sugar - I used fructose
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten
  • Zest of 1 orange
  • 30mls orange juice
  • 15g honey, plus extra for glazing

Method:

  • Place your tea bag into a cup and cover with boiling water
  • Leave to steep for 5 minutes and then remove the tea bag
  • Place into the fridge until cold
  • Put the raisins and currants into a mixing bowl
  • Pour over the tea and the whisky
  • Cover with cling film and leave to soak overnight
  • Preheat the oven to 160° Celsius
  • Sift the flour and spice into the mixing bowl with the fruit and mix in
  • Place the sugar, egg, orange zest and juice and the honey into a mixing bowl
  • Whisk together and then add to the fruit, mixing to incorporate all of the ingredients
  • Pour the mixture into a buttered loaf tin
  • Bake for 1 hour and 45 minutes
  • Baste the top generously with honey while still warm
  • Allow to cool thoroughly before slicing
http://tandysinclair.com/bara-brith/
 Recipe For Bara Brith

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In My Kitchen August 2014

Celia from Fig Jam And Lime Cordial has grown the in my kitchen contributors from a handful of us to somewhere around the 50 mark. I try and read each post every month as I just love taking a peek into everyone’s kitchens. I hope you enjoy this month’s peek in to mine!

I was gifted a lot of grapefruit and other that the curd I made, I also made some grapefruit cordial. Before I could make the cordial I had to order a bottle. It was slightly smaller than I anticipated (I didn’t look to see how many mls it took!) but it is perfect for cordial.

Cordial Bottle In My Kitchen August 2014

Cordial Bottle

In the post where I mentioned my muslin Sherry recommended that I buy some Chux cloths. After entering the term into Google I realized that were the blue kitchen cloths that I use to clean my plates when taking photographs. I went out and bought a roll straight away. I have used one already to make ricotta and what a pleasure! I have cleaned the cloth, but I now know that if it turns out too messy I can just toss it.

Kitchen Cloths In My Kitchen August 2014

Kitchen Cloths

When testing a recipe from Lorraine’s cook book I made pork cheeks. The result of that was a lot of lard! I have already made some Yorkshire puddings with the lard – it is amazingly sweet.

Lard In My Kitchen August 2014

Lard

I have chosen to make my own bacon following on from my Mastering Meat course. I had to find saltpetre for the recipe so the first step has been done.

Saltpetre In My Kitchen August 2014

Saltpetre

My parents came for their annual visit in June and brought with them my birthday present. Lucky me I could open it straight away! It is a lovely tea pot which came with 4 different flowering buds. Each one tasted the same icon wink In My Kitchen August 2014 I just love it and am using it for my herbal infusion teas as I can brew a pot at a time and leave it standing for 3 days, enjoying a cup a day.

Tea Pot In My Kitchen August 2014

Tea Pot

The new PR agency for Canderel have sent me a hamper to try out. I usually always have their chocolate at home as they are sugar free. I look forward to trying out the other products as I have only used Canderel Yellow to date.

Canderel Hamper In My Kitchen August 2014

Canderel Hamper

After the Knorr Function we were sent home with an amazing bag which I will take overseas with me for shopping. In the bag was a huge selection of goodies. I have given the sauces and cook in bags to my step son James and kept the stock pots for myself. The salad dressings are all at work as Dave has salad every day for lunch. James is most enthusiastic to try out all his products and it gives me great pleasure to spread the joy.

Knorr Hamper In My Kitchen August 2014

Knorr Hamper

I have been sent a selection of Chinese teas from Teavivre. I have yet to try them as I am using up my oldest teas first. Once I have done so I shall let you know how they taste.

Teavivre Tea In My Kitchen August 2014

Teavivre Tea

After Germany won the world cup Checkers sent me a bottle of German Wine. They have a fantastic selection of international wines and I have been fortunate to taste quite a few.

Wine From Checkers In My Kitchen August 2014

Wine From Checkers

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Tandy

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Recipe For Grapefruit Curd

In 2001 Dave brought home the sweetest, cutest puppy and we named her Patch. What we should have named her was Houdini, given how often she escapes from the house. She started this habit when someone broke a panel off our wooden gate. She spent the night on someone else’s couch and loved it! We repaired the gate and shortly after moved home and so we ‘puppy’ proofed the new place by putting in a metal gate. However, she found gaps in the fence between us and the neighbour and as she found one, and we ‘patched’ it up, she found another. Our next move curbed her houdini tricks as she could only escape if someone let her out the gate! Our final move was in 2005 and since then we have spent a lot of time preventing her from running away. The metal gate from the first move was used for the pedestrian gate and every other piece of fencing and the drive way gate was created to prevent her escaping. For a long time, the only way she got out was if someone let her. And then we got a puppy. Molly could fit through the gate gaps and so we fenced them up. And Patch learnt to climb the fenced bits and head out through the top gaps. For 4 years we have chased our tales preventing her from escaping. The penultimate idea was to create a sign across the gate which would give her no purchase. On Saturday night we were sitting at a friend, watching the rugby and in walked Patch! She always runs straight to Nico – a good 2 kilometres away from us, and over a main road. To remedy this we have had a new gate made. The gaps are too small for her to squeeze through and go right up to the top! Hopefully the fact that they are at an angle will prevent her climbing right over the top.

Grapefruit Curd Recipe For Grapefruit Curd

Grapefruit Curd

One thing that will disappear quickly, and you will not mind is this grapefruit curd. It needs a fair amount of time and care to make it nice and thick, but the stirring will be so worth your while.

Grapefruit Curd Topped With Swiss Meringue Recipe For Grapefruit Curd

Grapefruit Curd Topped With Swiss Meringue

Recipe For Grapefruit Curd

Ingredients:

  • 100g butter
  • 125g caster sugar - I used fructose
  • 3 eggs, lightly beaten
  • zest and juice of 2 grapefruit

Method:

  • Melt the butter over a bain-marie
  • Place the sugar and the eggs into a jug
  • Add the zest and strain in the juice
  • Whisk together until completely mixed
  • Add this mixture to the butter slowly over the heat
  • Stir continuously until thickened
  • Place into sterilized glass jars while still warm
  • Top each glass jar with a piece of parchment paper, making sure it touches the curd
  • Leave to cool completely before sealing the jars
http://tandysinclair.com/grapefruit-curd/
 Recipe For Grapefruit Curd

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I am submitting this recipe to Simple & In Season which is being hosted this month by Sally who blogs over at My Custard Pie.

Simple In Season Recipe For Grapefruit Curd

Simple & In Season

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A Weekend In The Winelands

I often get asked what people should do and where they should eat when visiting the winelands. I have decided to compile a short post on a weekend in the winelands so that I can refer them all to one post. This is by no means everything one can do in this beautiful region of the country, but it is certainly my top list of things to do and places to eat.

Plan to land at Cape Town International Airport on Friday afternoon as early as possible. The traffic leaving town is quite hectic and it could take you an hour to get to your accommodation. I recommend that you stay at The Country Guest House at 96 Winery Road. We spent our 10th wedding anniversary there and the rooms are extremely well appointed and you can sit outside and enjoy a sundowner while taking in the spectacular view.

Book that night for dinner at 96 Winery Road. This saves you from having to travel any more on the day. Be sure to leave space for their famous crème brûlée which has been on the menu since 1974!

96 Winery Road A Weekend In The Winelands

96 Winery Road

On Saturday morning breakfast will be served in the most beautiful setting and you will be offered a large choice of buffet items, as well as a hot breakfast. After you are done, head on down the R44 towards Stellenbosch. Stop at Cavalli Wine Estate to visit the art gallery and memorabilia rooms at the wine tasting centre. Don’t worry to do a wine tasting here. For your first wine tasting head on up the Allandale Road and follow the signs to Uva Mira. The wines are fantastic and the view is spectacular. After this drive through Stellenbosch and go to Warwick Wines. After your wine tasting have a picnic on the lawns or in one of the pods. Make sure to book and enquire to find out if you can do the tour of the vineyards. On your way back to your room, stop at Muratie. Even if you do not feel like another wine tasting, you need to try their port and see the cellar which is quite unique.

Warwick Wine Estate A Weekend In The Winelands

Warwick Wine Estate

Dinner on Saturday night is going to be something special. Book at The Restaurant at Waterkloof Wines and if it is summer get there early enough to watch the sun set over False Bay. After 13 years I never tire of this! Sit by the fire if it is winter, or on the balcony in summer while you sip on your wine and look at the menu. It changes seasonally so I cannot recommend any one dish for you to try but so far I have only had fantastic meals when we dine there.

Valentines Dinner A Weekend In The Winelands

Valentines Dinner

Sunday after another scrumptious breakfast pack your cases and head out on the R310. Stop off at Spier to take in the Eagle Encounter. Lunch must be at Pomegranate Restaurant situated on the Vergenoegd Wine Estate where you will get to see the duck parade. Sit outside if the weather permits and you might even see a fish eagle flying above you. Michael makes an amazing duck dish which I usually always have. Be sure to have one of the estate wines with your lunch as they are the best of the bunch in my opinion. You are only about 25 minutes from the airport so book a late afternoon flight to get you back home.

Pomegranate Restaurant A Weekend In The Winelands

Pomegranate Restaurant

Disclaimer: I have not been compensated in any way for this post. It has been done at my own discretion. If you do go to any of these places please let them know I sent you! This disclaimer is in line with my blogging policy.

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Recipe For Lavender Surprise Cake

The other day I was driving up the road and saw a gentleman pushing a shopping trolley. This is quite a common occurrence where I work as we have a second hand scrap metal dealer close to our office. The trolley pushers collect scrap metal and other recyclables from around the area and take it to the dealer for some money. This is the only income they earn and in my mind at least they are doing something to earn a wage. But, the surprise in the trolley was not the scrap metal, but the children in the trolley. My first thought was “oh sweet’, and then I realized that the children were being pushed around because the probably had no where else to be. They were not in school, being looked after in a safe environment, and probably their parents’ are homeless. We have a new neighbourhood watch in our area and they have taken to confiscating these trolleys. Basically they are taking away the persons only means of earning a livelihood, and in the case of the person I saw, his only means of keeping his children with him, and safe, while he works. I find this victimisation so unnecessary and wish those people doing the confiscating would think of proactive ways to give these people a hand up, rather than kick them down! We have one gentleman who collects our scrap metal once a week. He saves us the hassle of getting rid of it, and he earns himself money for food – a basic most people take for granted.

Lavender Surprise Bundt Cake Recipe For Lavender Surprise Cake

Lavender Surprise Bundt Cake

My lavender surprise cake was just that, a surprise. I had no idea what to expect when I cut it open and I was so impressed with how it worked out! You don’t have to use purple food colouring like I did, I just wanted something to match my blog. I am sure if you try this with any colour combination it will work out just as well, and you too will be surprised.

Lavender Surprise Cake Recipe For Lavender Surprise Cake

Lavender Surprise Cake

Lavender Surprise Cake

Ingredients:

  • 350g flour
  • 300g sugar - I used fructose
  • 5mls bicarbonate of soda
  • 5mls baking powder
  • 5mls salt
  • 250mls buttermilk
  • 375mls canola oil
  • 5mls lavender vinegar – you can use any vinegar
  • 2 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 2.5mls lavender petals – if you cannot find these, use rose petals or even fresh herbs
  • 5 drops gel food colouring of your choice

Method:

  • Preheat the oven to 160° Celsius
  • Spray a bundt tin if it is not non stick
  • Sieve the flour, sugar, bicarbonate of soda, baking powder and salt into a large mixing bowl
  • In a separate bowl mix together the buttermilk, oil, vinegar and eggs
  • Add these to the dry ingredients and mix until combined
  • Pour off half the batter into the bowl you used for the wet ingredients
  • To one half add the lavender petals and mix in well
  • To the other half mix in the food colouring and mix in well
  • Pour the coloured batter into the tin and make sure it is evenly distributed
  • Now pour the lavender batter into the tin
  • Use a skewer and lightly mix in the batters together – you just barely want to see some streaks
  • Bake for an hour
  • Remove from the oven and turn out and leave to cool completely before cutting
http://tandysinclair.com/lavender-surprise-cake/
 Recipe For Lavender Surprise Cake

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Blog-checking lines: For the July Daring Baker’s Challenge, Ruth from The Crafts of Mommyhood challenged us to bake a cake. But not just any cake; she asked us to add in a special surprise for our eyes as well as our taste buds!

A Slice Of Lavender Surprise Cake Recipe For Lavender Surprise Cake

A Slice Of Lavender Surprise Cake

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Recipe For Baked Arancini

When I made arancini the first time, Corina mentioned that she had baked hers when she made them. As I moderate my comments, both Kathryn and Mary Frances had not seen Corina’s comment, nor had they seen each others’ asking if these could be baked. I am always up for a challenge, and decided to try and bake arancini stuffed with cheese as part of a meal. On the Friday afternoon before I made these I went shopping with my friend Nadia. We were browsing the aisles for snack food and when I saw the vegetable crisps I decided to buy them to use for this recipe instead of making them. This was a short cut I was willing to take as I know how long it takes to form the arancini. The nice thing with baking them is that you don’t have to stand over a deep fryer and watch them or indeed fry them in batches. I loved the crunchy exterior and the gooey interior and would make these again for sure.

Baked Arancini Stuffed With Cheese Recipe For Baked Arancini

Baked Arancini Stuffed With Cheese

Baked Arancini Stuffed With Cheese

Ingredients:

    for the risotto
  • 800mls chicken stock
  • 250g arboria rice
  • 2g salt
  • 8 saffron threads
  • 30g Parmesan cheese, grated
  • for the arancini
  • 80g mozzarella cheese (the one you use for pizzas)
  • 2 egg whites
  • 80g crumbed vegetable crips

Method:

    for the risotto
  • Bring the stock to the boil in a sauce pan
  • Add the rice, salt and saffron
  • Bring back to the boil and cook for 15 minutes
  • Remove from the heat and after 1 minute, beat in the Parmesan
  • Set aside to cool completely
  • for the arancini
  • Preheat the oven to 160° Celsius
  • Wet your hands and using a serving spoon, scoop some rice into your palm
  • Shape into a large ball and then press your thumb into the centre to make a hole
  • Fill the hole with 10g of mozzarella and seal up and shape back into a ball
  • Wet your hands and repeat until you have used up all the rice - I made 8
  • Now beat the egg whites and dip one of the balls into the egg whites
  • Place the rice ball into the crumbed vegetable crisps and coat completely
  • Lightly compact the crisps with your hand and place the arancini into an oven proof dish
  • Bake for 20 minutes
http://tandysinclair.com/baked-arancini/
 Recipe For Baked Arancini

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The Millhouse Kitchen, Somerset West

When The Millhouse Kitchen opened on the Lourensford wine estate Dave and I went to enjoy a meal. This was two years ago and little has changed. The menu which is rustic Italian with French influences, then and now is inspiring, and the food mostly good. When we went the first time I put the poor service down to them having only just opened, but after our experience on Saturday night this must be a result of lack of interest. The venue is wonderful and during the day you can sit outside and enjoy the amazing view. We sat close to the fire, within site of the open kitchen and far away from the pub area.

The Millhouse Kitchen The Millhouse Kitchen, Somerset West

The Millhouse Kitchen

The wine list consists only of Lourensford Wines which are available per glass or per bottle and are well priced to suit any pocket. We chose the River Garden Cabernet Sauvignon Merlot 2013 (R95). As soon as we ordered this our waiter informed us there were only 3 bottles available. I was not sure why a restaurant situated on a wine estate could not have stocked up before dinner service on the wines, and this was a theme to continue through the night. Our wine was brought to the table and Hans told the waiter he would not be having wine. However, the waiter could not have been listening as after Dave had tasted the wine, he poured for Hans. I took over that glass and Hans ordered a brandy and coke, and Kaz ordered a cocktail from the very good list of options. It took some time for her cocktail to arrive, and the waiter blamed the bar for the slow service. The wine is fruity and slightly dry with a lovely nose and a light hint of berries. There is also an excellent selection of single malt whisky’s which are well priced. Corkage is R35 / 750ml for wine and R50 / 750ml MCC and sparkling wine.

Mussel Starter The Millhouse Kitchen, Somerset West

Mussel Starter

I ordered the mussels to start and these were served in a cider cream flavoured with oregano (R65). The 11 mussels were very flavourful and succulent. I was brought a bowl for the shells which was great attention to detail and I placed this bowl on the side plate. I was not sure why we had side plates and butter knives as we were not offered bread before our starters arrived. When the waiter cleared the starter plates he removed the side plates and we were under the impression bread was not on offer. However, we then saw the waiter bringing bread to other tables. When we asked why we had not received our bread he told us it was not ready from the kitchen before our starters arrived. However, when it was served it was cold! This means to me that he forgot. The bread on offer was focaccia with cheese, onion and tomato or ciabatta. Dave, Hans and Kaz each had a slice which was served with olive oil, balsamic vinegar and butter.

Slow Cooked Lamb Shank The Millhouse Kitchen, Somerset West

Slow Cooked Lamb Shank

My main course was a slow cooked lamb shank (R135) that was served off the bone and was really dry. The buttered mash was bland and cold, and I am not sure if it was not heated or if the cold bowl had something to do with this. The slow roasted vegetables were really nice and I used all the sauce to moisten my meat. I left the potatoes after one forkful. Both my main course and starter could be considered ‘finger food’ but I was not offered a finger bowl after each course.

Crème Brûlée The Millhouse Kitchen, Somerset West

Crème Brûlée

I was quite impressed that the dessert menu included a gluten free option as well as a cheese board. I chose the crème brûlée which was excellent. There was a crunchy crack to the brûlée and the custard was smooth. It was served with biscotti and strawberries. Our waiter appeared to not know the menu when he told Hans that there was no hot chocolate on the menu. Maybe he meant to say there was none available as when we checked the menu it was there, and when we asked him he said that the restaurant had not ordered any! Dave ordered an espresso which finally arrived cold after all of our desserts. Once again the waiter shifted blame and said that he had watched them pour it but the cup was cold. Dave had seen the cup standing on the counter so we knew the waiter had forgotten to bring it. And frankly, if he had felt it was cold he should have asked for a new one to be made. Expect to pay an average per head of R123 for the main meal.

The bad service resulted in a below average tip and I hope that this prompts the waiter to look at why he was not rewarded to the amount he expected to be. However, despite the food being excellent as far as everyone else at the table was concerned, I won’t be going back there in a rush.

Contact them on 021 847 2328 or pop in Tuesdays to Sundays for breakfast, lunch or dinner or Sundays for breakfast or lunch.

What I blogged:

Tandy

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