Recipe For Croissant Pudding

Celi asked to see a photo of my tortoise, and for those of you who do not know the history behind them, I have written it here.

"Stanley"

Stanley

A few years ago we were given two female tortoises from Cape Nature as they cannot be released into the wild once they have lived in captivity. At the time we were given them, our property was divided in two – a small garden fenced off on which the cottage sits, and a large, wild, overgrown garden on which the foundations for our house were. To this day we still refer to the front garden as the small garden – which is where the dogs are free to roam. But, when we got the tortoises the gate was left open unless the builders were on site. The first day they came home with me, I put them in the small garden and closed the gate. After a few days of making sure they were OK living off the land and not being fed, I opened the gate. The one tortoise went for a walk and we could not find her. An hour later the second one went after her, and for months, we did not see them.

When I was a child, we had an advert on television for a brand of lawnmowers names Rolux Magnum. It featured Stanley finding Livingstone in the grass that has just been mown. This advert came straight to mind as they had disappeared, one after the other into the long grass. Hence, the two females were named Stanley and Livingstone. Sadly, nature has had its way, and Livingstone has been swooped up by the eagle that live on the mountain above our house. Stanley is busy hibernating (I hope) and is very well hidden.

And, because I would not want to leave you without a recipe! Here is something I made when we had our croissant challenge earlier this year.

"Croissant And Blueberry Pudding"

Croissant And Blueberry Pudding

Croissant And Blueberry Pudding
 
Ingredients
  • 8 mini croissants
  • 60mls frozen blueberries
  • 2 eggs
  • 5mls vanilla extract
  • 30mls cream
Method
  1. Preheat the oven to 140° Celsius
  2. Butter 2 ramekins
  3. Break each croissant in half and distribute between the ramekins
  4. Add 2 tablespoons blueberries to each ramekin
  5. Best together the eggs, vanilla and cream
  6. Pour half into each ramekin
  7. Place the ramekins into a baking dish
  8. Fill up halfway with water to create a Bain Marie
  9. Bake for 35 minutes

Click on the links for conversions and notes.

Tandy

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Friday’s Food Quiz Number 72

My dear friend Pink has posted a quiz. If you want to do it yourself, please pop on over to her
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blog to read the ‘rules’. If you just want to (hopefully) learn something new, read my answers below. I am not sure if they are all correct!

  1. What is a rendang? An Indonesian spicy meat dish, served on special occasions and usually made from beef.
  2. What does “to butterfly” means? This is when you cut a piece of meat or fish in half without cutting all the way through. A spatchcock chicken is one that has been cut down the middle. The meat / chicken / fish is then flattened. It allows for quicker cooking, or for further flattening to make schnitzels, etc.
  3. What is meadowsweet and what is it used for? Meadowsweet is a herb used for flavouring jams, stews, drinks etc. Click on the link to read more.
  4. What does Mulligatawny means? pepper water
  5. What does the term “coats a spoon” means? a term used when making custard. The mixture needs to be thick enough to ‘stick’ to the back of a wooden spoon which means it has cooked and thickened enough.
  6. What is “Ouefs en Meurette”? eggs poached in red wine
  7. What are the main ingredients of paneer? milk and lemon juice
  8. What is the name of Nepal’s most favourite dish? Dal Bhat
  9. What is the main ingredient of Chaas? buttermilk
  10. What do gazpacho, bouillabaisse and bisque have in common? they all use tomatoes
"Chicken And Paneer Kadhai"

Chicken And Paneer Kadhai

Tandy

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Recipe For Waffle Batter

Shhhh, I have a guilty secret! I prefer waffles for breakfast over anything else!

Waffles and I have had a life long love affair. When we were children, my father would drive us in to Hillbrow so that we could have a treat of waffles at Milky Lane. Since my first waffle I have liked them plain, with maple syrup and fresh cream. Every now and then, my waffle would get some chocolate as well. This treat continued for me until I was in my twenties and I was diagnosed as being sucrose intolerant. I had a waffle for breakfast and this did nothing to make what I thought were hunger pangs go away. A friend and I were shopping at Sandton City and I was ready to pass out from hunger, and a waffle was my first choice for breakfast. After eating it, I did not feel any better, and she dragged me off to the chemist who told me to cut sugar out my diet completely for a week and see if it made a difference. It really did, and the illness that had been plaguing me for 6 months went away completely. Knowing that I could never again indulge in waffles I had not made was not going to deter me. I purchased a waffle iron and set about perfecting a recipe so that I could satisfy my need for my breakfast treat. I was so glad I did as when Dave’s kids were in their teens and sleeping over at our house this became Mark’s choice of dessert. He would help mix, sift, stir and fold and then dose his waffles with food colouring, sprinkles and real maple syrup. This is the one ingredient we agree has to go on a waffle. I would ensure that a little bit of batter was left over for me for breakfast. It was not long before Mark saw the wisdom of this, and waffles became a breakfast choice. So easy for me! Nowadays, waffles are a weekend treat and I can indulge to my hearts content.

Is there something you eat for breakfast that is a secret?

"waffles with chocolate dipped strawberries"

waffles with chocolate dipped strawberries

Waffle Batter
 
Ingredients
  • 5 large eggs, separated
  • ¼ cup Canderel Yellow 0%
  • 1 cup milk
  • ½ teaspoon, plus a pinch of salt
  • 2 cups flour, sifted
  • 4 tablespoons melted butter
Method
  1. Whisk the eggs yolks and the Canderel Yellow 0% until well mixed
  2. Whisk in the milk and ½ teaspoon salt
  3. Mix in the flour to make a smooth batter
  4. Mix in the butter
  5. Whisk the eggs whites with a pinch of salt to soft points
  6. Fold the egg whites into the batter
  7. Leave to rest for an hour
  8. Follow the instructions that came with your waffle iron

Click on the links for conversions and notes.

This post was commissioned and paid for in conjunction with the Canderel Yellow “What’s Your Guilty Food Secret?” Competition. This post is in line with my blogging policy

"Canderel Yellow"

Tandy

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In My Kitchen – June 2012

Please join Celia, who blogs over at Fig Jam and Lime Cordial, by sharing what is in your kitchen with us!

There is no photograph of what was in my fridge on the first, as we were in Scotland! We had an awesome holiday and hopefully in a few weeks time I will be able to share our experiences with you.

In my kitchen …..

Is some Patum Peperium, a new product for me, but something Dave is very familiar with. We bought two home with us from Scotland. One for our fridge, and the other for Dave’s fishing friend.

© A Little Goes A Long Way - It Is Very Strong

© A Little Goes A Long Way – It Is Very Strong

In my kitchen …..

(well, in my garden) are some carrot seeds. I am finally able to start planting in our bottom garden and so I have started with carrots.

© As We Are All Topsy Turvy Here, I Can Sow These Now

© As We Are All Topsy Turvy Here, I Can Sow These Now

In my kitchen …..

Is my new recipe book full of Italian delights! I have already tried two recipes from this and will start sharing with you soon.

© Hands On Workshop At The Good Food And Wine Show

© Hands On Workshop At The Good Food And Wine Show

In my kitchen …

Is this amazing seasoning from Scotland that has the most amazing vibrant colours. I am going to create a special dish with it when I have caught up (going on holiday does that to you, leaves you far behind in your work and I am going away again this month).

© My Lovely New Seasoning

© My Lovely New Seasoning

In my kitchen …

Is a small cooler bag. I have a square one from Marks & Spencer and it travels with us all over the world. This size is perfect for the car to keep lunches cold.

© My New Cooler Bag - All The Way From Heathrow

© My New Cooler Bag – All The Way From Heathrow

In my kitchen …

I found Nigella seeds in Scotland and so I had to buy them as I have not seen them here. My curry cook book is about to make an appearance again.

© New Recipes To Try!

© New Recipes To Try!

In my kitchen …

Is a cooler block – this kept our langoustines cold during an entire day of being in the car! It was a gift from the owner of Relish on the Isle of Skye as she knew we were travelling back to Ballatar.

© this was given to us free with langoustines we bought on the Isle of Skye

© this was given to us free with langoustines we bought on the Isle of Skye

In my kitchen …

is my signed copy of Tom Kitchin’s recipe book which I have used for guidance on numerous occasions already.

my signed copy which we used straight away

my signed copy which we used straight away

Wishing you all a joyful June.

Tandy

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Recipe For Grapefruit & Honey Sorbet

I was determined to be able to take part in this month’s mingle, and this is why you will find me, in the middle of winter, making a sorbet. I had recently purchased some grapefruit to make my Fresh From The Oven challenge of Breakfast Fruit Loaf, and the left overs were sitting in the fruit bowl, begging for attention. I was trying to think what to do with them, when I thought about sorbet. Now, this is something I would enjoy in the summer months, but I am not going to let something like rain get in the way of creating and enjoying a new sorbet. The challenge set for us this month from Cook Republic was to create a dish where one of the main ingredients was honey.  Well, this sorbet has precisely two ingredients and honey is one of them! It fits perfectly well into the theme, even if it does not fit perfectly well with the weather.

"Grapefruit And Honey Sorbet"

Grapefruit And Honey Sorbet

Grapefruit And Honey Sorbet
 
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED:
Ingredients
  • 175g honey
  • 450mls grapefruit juice
Method
  1. Gently warm the honey in a small saucepan
  2. Stir in 4 tablespoons of the juice
  3. Add this to the rest of the juice and refrigerate overnight
  4. Churn in your ice cream maker
  5. Freeze until set

Click on the links for conversions and notes.

Tandy

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Taste Of Cape Town, 2012

I was very fortunate to be offered two media tickets for this event as well as being able to give away four single tickets to readers of my blog. As Taste Of Cape Town was held close to our departure to Scotland, I was unable to get a post up about the event before the weekend was over. However, I want to share with you all, how amazing this year’s event was.

"our first bite of food for the night"

our first bite of food for the night

Dave was meant to work late and so I decided to ask my friend Erica to join me. She already had two tickets, so she gave hers to a friend and Ted (Erica’s husband) and Lynne ambled around together while Erica and I went on a serious tasting mission. Erica is a wine expert and it was a pleasure having her with me to talk to all the wine makers.

"bistro1682"

bistro1682

We started off at The Westin and I must say that in my opinion, they had by far the best restaurant set up. It looked as if you were gazing out over the city, a place that is so beautiful at night. Whereas this was the best setting, Sofia’s was the best meal I had. Craig Cormack is an extremely talented chef, and subsequent to this event, Dave and I have been to eat at the restaurant for a second time. Bistro1682 once again impressed, and Erica and I are going to spend some time in the kitchen after the winter break.

"sofia's at morgenster"

sofia’s at morgenster

While we were wandering around (the layout is a bit confusing) Erica and I saw Peter Goffe-Wood and he was more than willing to have his photo taken! I would have loved the opportunity to sit down with him and have a glass of wine and a long chat but this was not the time, nor the place.

"erica and pete"

erica and pete

Part of the media experience included a lot of drinking! As neither Erica nor I were driving home, this meant we could take part in the whole experience. However, try as we may, we did not get through all the drinking we could have.  We enjoyed a test tube of Jägermeistier and I got a badge which you can turn on and it flashes (which I have given to a friend who enjoys all sorts of gimmicks). We were given lovely glasses at Bernini, and we purchased two Cognac glasses from the Brandy Tent.

"a test tube of alcohol!"

a test tube of alcohol!

After talking to some very interesting and wonderful people, Erica and I made our last stop 96 Winery Road. For anyone who knows me well, this is my all time favourite place to eat. I have been a part of the ‘family’ since 1974 when the original Gatrilles opened in Johannesburg. Natasha (the chef) has just had a baby and her husband was there as the baby sitter. As we had not completed all the drinking ‘tasks’ for the night, I left him with my media ticket.

"the famous duck and cherry pie"

the famous duck and cherry pie

If you live close to Durban or Johannesburg then be sure to check when the events are being held there. It is really worth going if you want to try out new restaurants. This year, the pop up restaurant concept was introduced, and on the night we went we were lucky enough to taste food from Tokara. This is now on our list of places to eat at!

"the chef's recommendation"

the chef’s recommendation

Disclaimer: I was invited to attend this event. I was not asked to write a blog post about the event. This post is in line with my blogging policy.

Tandy

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Recipe For Caramelized Apples

Have you ever googled “internet dating”?  If you do, you will get about 26,800,000 results in 0.17 seconds. I have not had to google this term before, but having been recently accused of some behaviour I thought I would. So, supposedly I set up a fake persona to ‘date’ someone. That means that out of the millions of websites out there that deal with internet dating, I chose the same one that she did. And then I created a persona that would match her criteria! So, once I had got the right website, I would have to find the right person. Given that people use avatar’s and screen names, this in itself would have been quite a feat. But, I have been accused of being capable of this. I am so clever apparently that I have been told I maintained this ‘affair’ for quite some time. I am not sure how I managed to do all of this, but it goes to confirm one thing for me – I am always going to be responsible in this person’s mind for all the bad things that befall her. Apparently, I am the source of all evil, much like Eve in the Garden of Eden when she accepted the apple, it was all the snake’s fault! It is much easier to blame me, than take responsibility herself. As for apples, well, they make the perfect accompaniment to a roast pork in my opinion and are better served up simply cooked, when you want more than a sauce.

"Caramelized Apples"

Caramelized Apples

Caramelized Apples
 
Ingredients
  • 15g butter
  • 2 apples cored, and cut into eighths
  • 3 sage leaves
  • 1 tablespoon cabernet sauvignon vinegar (or any vinegar you have in your pantry)
  • Freshly ground black pepper for seasoning
Method
  1. Over a gentle heat, melt the butter in a frying pan
  2. Add the apples and the sage and cook until the apples have taken on some colour
  3. Add the vinegar and continue cooking the apples until they are completely cooked through
  4. Add a twist or two of black pepper and serve

Click on the links for conversions and notes.

Tandy

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Friday’s Food Quiz Number 24

This quiz from my friend Pink was very challenging for me!

1. On what day are hot cross buns traditionally eaten?

Good Friday. In pagan times, the round bun with a cross was eaten to honor the pagan goddess of Spring.

2. What is the tradition behind the roast lamb dinner that many people eat on Easter Sunday?

Easter is embedded in the traditions surrounding Pesach – the Jewish Passover. For the Passover, a lamb was sacrificed. Lamb was eaten, and the blood was used to mark the door posts of the Jewish homes so that the angel of death would know which homes to pass over to follow G-d’s instructions. For Passover, the seder plate includes a lamb bone.

3. Why is a Simnel cake traditionally decorated with 11 marzipan balls?

Could this be for the people at the last Supper, excluding Jesus? 

4. Why is eggs part of the celebrations during Easter?

Again, only knowing the Jewish traditions, eggs are eaten at Passover to symbolize eternal life.

5. Where is a special kind of bread, called “paska”, prepared for Easter Sunday? (Paska is made of flour and yeast and is decorated with a cross and flowers and birds.)

paska sounds Russian – so, I would guess somewhere in what was once called the Soviet Union, Romania, Bulgaria … 

6. Where is it a tradition to paint eggs red for Easter and what does it symbolizes?

Eastern Orthodox Christianity

7. Where is dove shaped Pannetone and Colomba breads often given as gifts over Easter?

Pannetone is Italian but Colomba sounds Spanish, so guessing the Mediterranean countries?

"Panettone"

Panettone

8. What is the name of the Greek Easter bread, traditionally given as an Easter gift from children to their godparents in Greece?

I have no idea!

9. What does Pretzels represent?

it is shaped as a knot – and I think has something to do with representing a cross

10. What is the most famous Russian Easter bread called?

I am clueless!

Tandy

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Meadowsweet

In the medieval times, meadowsweet was a very popular stewing herb. Meadowsweet forms a basal clump of pinnate leaves, and bears dense, frothy, tall corymbs of almond scented, creamy white flowers to 1.2m in summer. The leaves smell like wintergreen when crushed. The plant occurs in moist meadows and around fresh water and is widely distributed across Asia and Europe.

 

Hardy meadowsweet will grow in full sun provided the soil is very moist. It prefers a well enriched alkaline soil. Propagate the species by seed in autumn, or by stratified seed and plant in spring, or by division in spring. Every 3 to 4 years lift and divide in autumn.

Cut the flowers when in full bloom and use fresh for culinary use. The flowers are used to flavour jams, stewed fruits and wine, as well as mead and Norfolk Punch.

information sourced from The Complete Book of Herbs

Tandy

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