Salad Burnet

The ferny leaves of salad burnet have a scent reminiscent of fresh cucumber. It is a dainty and hardy evergreen perennial that will grow to 45cm. It forms a low basal rosette of pinnate leaves with many paired, toothed, oval leaflets. Borne on tall, slender stalks, the tiny green, wind pollinated flowers with deep red anthers are borne in dense globose heads.

These plants prefer full sun to partial shade, and a well drained, moist, slightly acid to alkaline soil that contains compost. Propagate by sowing seeds in either spring or autumn. Plants that are allowed to flower will self seed, producing particularly healthy plants. Space seedlings about 30cm apart. Cut emerging flower stems for increased leaf production. Harvest leaves for fresh use as required. Lift roots in autumn for drying.

Salad burnet is an ingredient in several sauces, including ravigote, which is used in French cooking and goes well with cold roast chicken or seafood. Add young leaves to salads and drinks, chilled summer soups and to soft cheeses. Also use as a garnish or infused in vinegar. This herb does not dry well, but can be frozen in ice cube trays.

information sourced from The Complete Book of Herbs

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26 thoughts on “Salad Burnet

  1. I really enjoy these informative posts of yours–so much to learn from

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    1. thank you Usha 🙂

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  2. Informative post!

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    1. and not one to tempt you away from your cleanse 😉

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  3. I, too, am not familiar with this new plant.. that’s why I love visiting you, I’m always learning something new. Is there a flavor or seasoning that is somewhat similar to this one?? Is it available dried in specialty shops?? xx

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    1. Barbara, you can use mint in the place of salad burnet. It does not dry well so I am sure you won’t be able to find it in a specialty shop. However, it does grow in Northern America so maybe you can find some seeds?

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  4. Sounds lovely, Tandy: I wonder where it got its name?

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    1. I wonder as well Kate?

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  5. It sounds so versatile indeed! I haven’t seen it much here though. Perhaps I need to ask for it!
    Lorraine @ Not Quite Nigella sharing the blog ♥ Home-made No Churn Blue Ribbon Vanilla Ice CreamMy Profile

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    1. I am not sure it grows in Australia!

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  6. This is a new one to me, will have to see if it grows anywhere in Spain, I’ve certainly never seen it in England….

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    1. Let me know please Tanya!

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  7. Ahh, that is a new one on me. As ever I learn something on each visit.
    Jacqueline sharing the blog ♥ Blackberry Cake with Orange DrizzleMy Profile

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    1. It is a new one for me as well Jacs 🙂

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  8. I guess I must be living on a deserted island or under a rock as I have not heard of this delightful herb. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. I am learning new things all the time just by sharing 🙂

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  9. This plant looks beautiful. Sounds wonderful in food too 🙂

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    1. I am curious to taste it!

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  10. Salad burnet (from the French word “brunette”)grows wild all over France. It makes a very good flavoured vinegar. It’s also very good on egg mayonnaise sandwiches.

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    1. That sandwich sounds good! I shall have to find some when we are in France next year 🙂

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  11. I remember your blueberry muffins… who could forget those delicious treats. I’ve also never heard of this plant before, well you learn something new everyday 🙂

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    1. It is wonderful to learn new things!

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  12. I’ve never heard of this! How pretty!
    Joanne sharing the blog ♥ Recipe: Guinness Chocolate CheesecakeMy Profile

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    1. It is! So nice to have an gravatar for you 🙂

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  13. What an attractive plant, Tandy. I’ve never heard of it before, but I learn new things from your posts, all the time. 🙂

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    1. I also think it is quite pretty, but I am not sure we can get this here 🙂

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