Thyme

There are 350 species of thyme with a wide variety of fragrances, flavours and uses. Most are sun loving, perennial woody subshrubs or creeping woody plants with a neat habit that are high in fragrant essential oils. Culinary varieties include:

  • garden / common
  • caraway / seedcake
  • conehead
  • Spanish
  • lemon
  • broad leaf
  • winter flowering
  • Azores / orange peel
Sourdough Bread and Black Cherry & Thyme Jam
Sourdough Bread and Black Cherry And Thyme Jam

This herb requires food drainage and a sunny position. Raise thyme from seed in spring and propagate varieties by cuttings and by division. The leaves are low in moisture and easily air dried out of direct sunlight. It will retain its flavour.

Thyme is a major culinary herb in Europe where is shines in slow cooked casseroles and dishes containing meat, poultry or game. It can be assertive and dominate other milder flavours so robust companions, such as onions, red wine and garlic work well. Use the herb in terrines, pâtés, meat pies, marinades, eggplant and tomato dishes and thick vegetable based soups. Dried thyme is often used in the jambalayas and gumbos of Creole and Cajun cooking.

information sourced from The Complete Book of Herbs

What I blogged:

Lavender and Lime Signature

Top of Page

No votes yet.
Please wait...

20 thoughts on “Thyme

  1. i have the lemon thyme & thyme growing in pots for years now-however they always seem to be little–really little

    No votes yet.
    Please wait...
    1. The leaves stay very small of some of the varieties I grow 🙂

      No votes yet.
      Please wait...
  2. Great story,
    I have a regular thyme and a lemon thyme in my garden… and they get used all the time … hehe that sounded funny.
    GourmetGetaways sharing the blog ♥ Perth Dining with a ViewMy Profile

    No votes yet.
    Please wait...
    1. Great pun! I also have both growing wild 🙂

      No votes yet.
      Please wait...
  3. I just love its lemony essence…my favorite addition to chicken =)

    No votes yet.
    Please wait...
    1. mine too!

      No votes yet.
      Please wait...
  4. We grew thyme over the summer and used it most every night. Can’t wait till next year!

    No votes yet.
    Please wait...
    1. It is such a hardy herb that mine grows back each year 🙂

      No votes yet.
      Please wait...
  5. Such an important herb in cooking for sure 😀

    Cheers
    CCU

    No votes yet.
    Please wait...
    1. Absolutely Uru 🙂

      No votes yet.
      Please wait...
  6. Besides being an attractive garden plant, thyme is pretty much my favorite savory herb. There are few things I don’t happily toss it in for enhancement, and I know it’s the one characteristic flavor I’d miss most from my soup broths, whether meat-based or vegetarian. Lovely post!

    No votes yet.
    Please wait...
    1. Thanks Kathryn, I also love using thyme in desserts 🙂

      No votes yet.
      Please wait...
  7. Thyme is definitely a comfort flavor for me!

    No votes yet.
    Please wait...
    1. That is interesting to know Joanne 🙂

      No votes yet.
      Please wait...
  8. I always have a small thyme bush or two right outside my kitchen door.

    No votes yet.
    Please wait...
    1. Mine grow wild in my garden and I have a pot as well near my kitchen 🙂

      No votes yet.
      Please wait...
  9. I had no idea that there were that many varieties of thyme! 😮
    Lorraine @ Not Quite Nigella sharing the blog ♥ Cake Tin LasagnaMy Profile

    No votes yet.
    Please wait...
    1. me either – and I thought that having 5 was a lot!

      No votes yet.
      Please wait...
  10. I love thyme and I never realised there were so many varieties.
    Have a super weekend Tandy.
    🙂 Mandy xo

    No votes yet.
    Please wait...
    1. I have about 5 varieties in my garden 🙂

      No votes yet.
      Please wait...

I would love to hear from you ♥

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

CommentLuv badge