Granary Bread Using A Soudough Starter

Head straight on to the recipe for Granary Bread ♥

The only brand of granary flour I have been able to find is from Hovis. This British company was started in 1886 by Richard ‘Stoney’ Smith, a miller from Macclesfield Cheshire. The wheat is malted and this adds the most amazing flavour to the bread once baked. Anyone visiting from the UK is more than welcome to bring me a kilogram of this flour as a gift. I made several loaves of this granary bread to enjoy with my homemade jam.

Granary Bread With Strawberry And Lavender Jam
Granary Bread With Strawberry And Lavender Jam

I have been flattened by the heat. Normally I am quite used to the fact that February is heat wave month. But this year, someone got it very wrong and our heat wave started in December. I have coped quite well in my opinion, walking in the morning before it is too hot, and going about my gym routine at a slow but steady pace in the afternoons. I have spent a lot of time cooling off in the pool and my swimming costume has become the most worn item in my wardrobe. But on Monday it was just too much. By 8am I was hot and bothered. I turned the fan on next to my desk and wet my dress! This is the first summer I have worn a dress in years but anything more than that is just too stifling. At noon I succumbed to the heat and started making plans to leave the office. Our delivery truck arrived shortly after lunch and as soon as I had done my work I went home. It was humid and I felt wiped out by the heat. I wallowed in the water, searching out the cool spots and eventually when Dave got home we sat in the water having our evening tipple. What do you do to cool down in summer?

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5 from 3 votes

Recipe For Granary Bread

This bread makes use of malted wheat grain flour and sourdough starter.
Author: an original recipe from Lavender and Lime

Ingredients

  • 175 g fed sourdough starter
  • 350 g granary flour plus extra for dusting
  • 12 g salt
  • 40 mls olive oil
  • 110 mls tepid water

Instructions

  • Place all of the ingredients into a bowl
  • Mix by hand until a dough forms
  • Turn out onto a lightly floured surface
  • Knead for 10 minutes
  • Place into a bowl and cover
  • Place the bowl into the fridge overnight
  • Remove the bowl from the fridge and leave the dough to prove until doubled in size
  • Turn out onto a lightly floured surface and gently knock back
  • Roll into a thick sausage shape
  • Spray a loaf tin and place the dough in the tin, seam side down
  • Cover and leave to prove until doubled in size
  • Preheat the oven to 180° Celsius
  • Bake for 40 minutes
  • Turn out onto a wire rack
  • Leave to cool completely before cutting
Granary Bread
Granary Bread

Click on the links for conversions and notes.

What I blogged February 4:

Lavender and Lime Signature

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30 thoughts on “Granary Bread Using A Soudough Starter

  1. Hovis is so well known in England – my grandmother always used to buy a loaf of Hovis, I remember it way back from the days when she’d buy it from the bakers unsliced as it stayed fresher for longer! Lovely loaf – wish I could send you some flour but I think postage would be horrific 🙂

  2. I’ve heard of hovis but have never tried it! Now I’m eager and I love experimenting with new foods and enjoy learning about them on your site Tandy. But I did laugh outloud at February being warm, Ha, as if in Buffalo!!! Too much snow here =)


  3. I think you must be having the same weather as us. It’s been stifling this week. They warned it was going to be a hot summer and they weren’t wrong. Yeesh. Your bread looks fabulous though. 🙂


  4. What a delicious loaf of bread!!
    I have tried using a sour dough starter but I have to admit, I don’t have the patience most of the time to keep feeding it. I admire anyone that can care for a sour dough starter.
    Thanks for sharing
    Julie
    Gourmet Getaways

  5. This looks so delicious! I am quite new in baking! I am more in cooking 🙂 Is this difficult for the beginner like me?

    Please visit and follow my blog (www.lazymomcooking.wordpress.com) or my Instagram (lazymom_cooking) for some recipe ideas 🙂


  6. I believe that you can only find Hovis Granary flour is because they trademarked the word. That’s why other flours may be called ‘multi-grain’ etc. Haven’t checked this so might be wrong but it popped out from the back of my brain somewhere!

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