Lemon Grass

This tall tropical grass has a powerful lemon fragrance, and is widely used in the cooking of Thailand, Vietnam and other Southeast Asian countries. It also makes a vitamin A rich tea. Lemon grass has narrow, leafy stalks that grow in large clumps that reach 1m or more.

Lemon grass Custard Pots
Lemongrass Custard Pots

This herb is best suited to a sunny position, well drained soil, warm growing conditions – ideally between 18°C and 38°C – and high humidity. In cooler areas it is best grown in a large pot and overwintered indoors. To propagate carefully divide the clump. Water plants regularly. Harvest stems as required. Cut the upper green part into segments and dry it out of direct sunlight, then store it in airtight containers and use it for tea. For cooking, wrap the white bulbous lower portion in plastic wrap and store in the refrigerator for several weeks.

The strong citrus flavour of lemon grass goes well in Southeast Asian cooking and is often teamed with chillies and coconut milk. Lemon grass is also an excellent addition to Western cooking, particularly in fish and seafood dishes. Use the lower white part of the fresh stems and slice finely crosswise to avoid a fibrous texture in the finished dish. If using a whole stem or large pieces, bruise first to release the flavour and remove before serving.

information sourced from The Complete Book of Herbs

recipes with lemon grass include my green curry paste, Sichuan pepper prawns and Indonesian chicken.

Lavender and Lime Signature

Top of Page

No votes yet.
Please wait...

32 thoughts on “Lemon Grass

  1. I love lemongrass flavor.. I’ve not tried the fresh stuff yet, this is really helpful!

    No votes yet.
    Please wait...
    1. The fresh stuff is amazing to cook with 🙂

      No votes yet.
      Please wait...
  2. Hi Tandy, lemon grass is excellent in a number of Indian curries as well. I have it in my cup of masala chai everyday. Enjoy your day

    No votes yet.
    Please wait...
    1. Oh, I must try that!

      No votes yet.
      Please wait...
  3. I love lemongrass and ginger! They are so wonderfully good!

    No votes yet.
    Please wait...
    1. I am on a ginger mission at present!

      No votes yet.
      Please wait...
  4. I’ve always wanted to cook using fresh lemongrass! And to use in some homemade thai curry–a cooking adventure I have yet to undertake. I’ll keep checking the international markets, and hopefully one will carry it!

    No votes yet.
    Please wait...
    1. the bottled one is just as good if that is all you can find 🙂

      No votes yet.
      Please wait...
  5. I love the fresh flavor of lemongrass. thanks for this majorly informative post!

    No votes yet.
    Please wait...
    1. my pleasure! I’m trying to comment on your salted caramel YUM but my playbook is not letting me!

      No votes yet.
      Please wait...
  6. I have heard of lemon grass and it sounds like such an exotic ingredient 😀

    Cheers
    Choc Chip Uru

    No votes yet.
    Please wait...
    1. it is quite exotic CCU 🙂

      No votes yet.
      Please wait...
  7. I shall have to see if we can grow it here as, like Giovanna of Blue Jelly Beans, can´t find it in Spain. Funnily enough I treated myself to a massage yesterday and one of the oils used was Lemongrass and it was gorgeous!

    No votes yet.
    Please wait...
    1. It is such a great essential oil to use! I have it in my kitchen for the summer months 🙂

      No votes yet.
      Please wait...
  8. I love lemon grass! I think I must try to grow it!

    No votes yet.
    Please wait...
    1. it looks really easy to grow Pink 🙂

      No votes yet.
      Please wait...
  9. Oh, I love lemon grass! When I lived in Panama we used to drink the tea, and last December when I went back to Panama one of the things I asked for was a tea of lemon grass… delicious.
    Can’t find it here though 🙁

    No votes yet.
    Please wait...
    1. That is a pity 🙁 But you can use lemon grass essential oil as a replacement, as long as it is organic 🙂

      No votes yet.
      Please wait...
  10. Thanks Tandy, very interesting.
    *hugs*

    No votes yet.
    Please wait...
    1. hugs to you too 🙂

      No votes yet.
      Please wait...
  11. Thanks for the info, Tandy. I’ve only bought it in jars, bt i do love using it. Happy weekend to you. xx

    No votes yet.
    Please wait...
    1. A friend of mine has loads of it growing in her garden of her new house so I am going to take some from her for our garden 🙂

      No votes yet.
      Please wait...
  12. Realising now how much I wanted to plant but haven’t as we still wait on the decision of whether we will be relocating to Namibia for 2 years. So frustrating only “half” gardening and planting.
    🙂 Mandy

    No votes yet.
    Please wait...
    1. I know how you feel Mandy! When will you know whether or not you are going?

      No votes yet.
      Please wait...
      1. Crossing fingers and toes here… in the next 8 weeks but who knows as it has been going on quite a while already. You can bet though that when “they” are happy, we will have to jump right to it and get cracking and rush over. Never a dull moment.

        No votes yet.
        Please wait...
        1. that means you have to be very organized Mandy xox

          No votes yet.
          Please wait...
          1. Always. 😀

            No votes yet.
            Please wait...
          2. I am good at packing at a moments notice if you need help!

            No votes yet.
            Please wait...
  13. It grows well at my house. I love to take the thick stem and use it as a skewer for shrimp. Yum!

    No votes yet.
    Please wait...
    1. oh, that is a great idea!

      No votes yet.
      Please wait...

I would ♥ to hear from you (please note comments will only be visible once I reply)

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.